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suppose i have two tables. articles and comments.

when i am selecting columns from articles table, i also want to select the number of comments on the article in the same select statement... (suppose the common field between these two tables is articleid)

how do I do that? I can get it done, but I do not know if my way would be efficient, so i want to learn the right way.

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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use:

   SELECT a.articleid, 
          COUNT(*) AS num_comments
     FROM ARTICLES a
LEFT JOIN COMMENTS c ON c.articleid = a.articleid
 GROUP BY a.articleid

Whatever columns you want from the ARTICLES table, you'll have to define in the GROUP BY clause because they aren't having an aggregate function performed on them.

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1  
Just adding group by is not always the best thing to do. I see people write queries with 100s (ok not 100s but a LOT) of columns in their group by clause because they do not know how to use aggregates correctly. That is why I posted a solution using a subquery. –  JonH Feb 7 '10 at 3:32
    
@JonH: SQL Server (among other DBs) similar won't allow you to list/return columns that aren't wrapped in aggregate functions (unless using analytic functions) without defining them within the GROUP BY clause. If you omit the GROUP BY clause, you will receive an error on SQL Server based on what is provided. MySQL is the only DB that supports such functionality, and it is non-standard: dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/group-by-hidden-columns.html –  OMG Ponies Feb 7 '10 at 3:39
    
I know that my point was a lot of people do not understand how group by and aggregates work. I've seen people group by 100s of columns just to get what they think might be the correct result. –  JonH Feb 7 '10 at 18:46
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This should be more efficient because the group by is only done on the Comment table.

SELECT  
       a.ArticleID, 
       a.Article, 
       isnull(c.Cnt, 0) as Cnt 
FROM Article a 
LEFT JOIN 
    (SELECT c.ArticleID, count(1) Cnt
     FROM Comment c
    GROUP BY c.ArticleID) as c
ON c.ArticleID=a.ArticleID 
ORDER BY 1
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This should do it..

SELECT
   article_column_1, article_column_2, count( ct.articleid) as comments
FROM
   article_table at
   LEFT OUTER JOIN comment_table ct ON at.articleid = ct.articleid
GROUP BY 
   article_column_1, article_column_2
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1  
You probably want a GROUP BY. In case anyone is concerned, this will properly return 0 if there are no joined records. –  le dorfier Feb 7 '10 at 3:25
    
le dorfier is correct - this query will not run on SQL Server as-is. –  OMG Ponies Feb 7 '10 at 3:41
    
yes indeed guys ... edited to work .. –  Gaby aka G. Petrioli Feb 7 '10 at 3:49
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SELECT 
       a.Article,
       a.ArticleID,
       t.COUNTOFCOMMENTS
FROM
       Article a
LEFT JOIN
       Comment c
ON c.ArticleID=a.ArticleID
LEFT JOIN
(SELECT ArticleID, COUNT(CommentID) AS COUNTOFCOMMENTS FROM Comments GROUP BY ArticleID) t
ON t.ArticleID = a.ArticleID
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This will not work as there is no articleID in your subquery .. –  Gaby aka G. Petrioli Feb 7 '10 at 3:24
    
So add one very simple stuff. –  JonH Feb 7 '10 at 3:30
    
@Gaby - edited to show the article id. –  JonH Feb 7 '10 at 3:31
    
@OP - you can also take out the LEFT JOIN Comment c if you want, I only put it there so that you can pull columns from the comments table if you'd like. –  JonH Feb 7 '10 at 3:34
1  
This will return a row for each comment because of the first Left Join. –  JBrooks Feb 7 '10 at 3:39
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