Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

All the examples I look at for reflection show creating a new instance of an unknown implementation, and casting that implementation to it's interface. The issue with this is that now you can't call any new methods (only overrides) on the implementing class, as your object reference variable has the interface type. Here is what I have:

Class c = null;
try {
    c = Class.forName("com.path.to.ImplementationType");
} catch (ClassNotFoundException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}
InterfaceType interfaceType = null;
try {
    interfaceType = (InterfaceType)c.newInstance();
} catch (InstantiationException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
} catch (IllegalAccessException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}

If I only have a reference to "com.path.to.ImplementationType", and I don't know what that type might be (it is coming from a config file), then how can I use the class name to cast it to ImplementationType? Is this even possible?

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 13 down vote accepted

This line seems to sum up the crux of your problem:

The issue with this is that now you can't call any new methods (only overrides) on the implementing class, as your object reference variable has the interface type.

You are pretty stuck in your current implementation, as not only do you have to attempt a cast, you also need the definition of the method(s) that you want to call on this subclass. I see two options:

1. As stated elsewhere, you cannot use the String representation of the Class name to cast your reflected instance to a known type. You can, however, use a String equals() test to determine whether your class is of the type that you want, and then perform a hard-coded cast:

try {
   String className = "com.path.to.ImplementationType";// really passed in from config
   Class c = Class.forName(className);
   InterfaceType interfaceType = (InterfaceType)c.newInstance();
   if (className.equals("com.path.to.ImplementationType") {
      ((ImplementationType)interfaceType).doSomethingOnlyICanDo();
   } 
} catch (Exception e) {
   e.printStackTrace();
}

This looks pretty ugly, and it ruins the nice config-driven process that you have. I dont suggest you do this, it is just an example.

2. Another option you have is to extend your reflection from just Class/Object creation to include Method reflection. If you can create the Class from a String passed in from a config file, you can also pass in a method name from that config file and, via reflection, get an instance of the Method itself from your Class object. You can then call invoke(http://java.sun.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/lang/reflect/Method.html#invoke(java.lang.Object, java.lang.Object...)) on the Method, passing in the instance of your class that you created. I think this will help you get what you are after.

Here is some code to serve as an example. Note that I have taken the liberty of hard coding the params for the methods. You could specify them in a config as well, and would need to reflect on their class names to define their Class obejcts and instances.

public class Foo {

    public void printAMessage() {
    System.out.println(toString()+":a message");
    }
    public void printAnotherMessage(String theString) {
        System.out.println(toString()+":another message:" + theString);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Class c = null;
        try {
            c = Class.forName("Foo");
            Method method1 = c.getDeclaredMethod("printAMessage", new Class[]{});
            Method method2 = c.getDeclaredMethod("printAnotherMessage", new Class[]{String.class});
            Object o = c.newInstance();
            System.out.println("this is my instance:" + o.toString());
            method1.invoke(o);
            method2.invoke(o, "this is my message, from a config file, of course");
        } catch (ClassNotFoundException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (NoSuchMethodException nsme){
            nsme.printStackTrace();
        } catch (IllegalAccessException iae) {
            iae.printStackTrace();
        } catch (InstantiationException ie) {
            ie.printStackTrace();
        } catch (InvocationTargetException ite) {
            ite.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

and my output:

this is my instance:Foo@e0cf70
Foo@e0cf70:a message
Foo@e0cf70:another message:this is my message, from a config file, of course
share|improve this answer
    
Where can I download the jar for the methods InterfaceType and ImplementationType? –  Santiago Jun 7 at 1:33
//====Single Class Reference used to retrieve object for fields and initial values. Performance enhancing only====          
Class<?>    reference           =   vector.get(0).getClass();
Object      obj                 =   reference.newInstance();
Field[]     objFields           =   obj.getClass().getFields(); 
share|improve this answer
1  
Thats how i solved the need to retrieve information to create a new instance from an unknown class to use its fields for another generic search (by field / value and or filters). Forget the "performance" comment, it has something to do with a few lines after these. –  GoToJack Dec 5 '12 at 13:17

As an addendum to akf's answer you could use instanceof checks instead of String equals() calls:

String cname="com.some.vendor.Impl";
try {
  Class c=this.getClass().getClassLoader().loadClass(cname);
  Object o= c.newInstance();
  if(o instanceof Spam) {
    Spam spam=(Spam) o;
    process(spam);
  }
  else if(o instanceof Ham) {
    Ham ham = (Ham) o;
    process(ham);
  }
  /* etcetera */
}
catch(SecurityException se) {
  System.err.printf("Someone trying to game the system?%nOr a rename is in order because this JVM doesn't feel comfortable with: “%s”", cname);
  se.printStackTrace();
}
catch(LinkageError le) {
  System.err.printf("Seems like a bad class to this JVM: “%s”.", cname);
  le.printStackTrace();
}
catch(RuntimeException re) { 
  // runtime exceptions I might have forgotten. Classloaders are wont to produce those.
  re.printStackTrace();
}
catch(Exception e) { 
  e.printStackTrace();
}

Note the liberal hardcoding of some values. Anyways the main points are:

  1. Use instanceof rather than equals(). If anything, it will co-operate better when refactoring.
  2. Be sure to catch these runtime errors and security ones too.
share|improve this answer

If you knew the Class of ImplementationType you could create an instance of it. So what you are trying to do is not possible.

share|improve this answer

You want to be able to pass in a Class and get a type-safe instance of that class? Try the following:

public static void main(String [] args) throws Exception {
    String s = instanceOf(String.class);
}

public static <T> T instanceOf (Class<T> clazz) throws Exception {
    return clazz.newInstance();
}
share|improve this answer

I'm not absolutely sure I got your question correctly, but it seems you want something like this:

    Class c = null;
    try {
        c = Class.forName("com.path.to.ImplementationType");
    } catch (ClassNotFoundException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
    T interfaceType = null;
    try {
        interfaceType = (T) c.newInstance();
    } catch (InstantiationException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    } catch (IllegalAccessException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

Where T can be defined in method level or in class level, i.e. <T extends InterfaceType>

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.