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I am writing a Play (2.2) controller in Scala, which should return the result of a query against OrientDB. Now, I have succeeded in writing a synchronous version of said controller, but I'd like to re-write it to work asynchronously.

My question is; given the below code (just put together for demonstration purposes), how do I re-write my controller to interact asynchronously with OrientDB (connecting and querying)?

import play.api.mvc.{Action, Controller}
import play.api.libs.json._
import com.orientechnologies.orient.`object`.db.OObjectDatabasePool
import java.util
import com.orientechnologies.orient.core.sql.query.OSQLSynchQuery
import scala.collection.JavaConverters._

object Packages extends Controller {
  def packages() = Action { implicit request  =>
    val db = OObjectDatabasePool.global().acquire("http://localhost:2480", "reader", "reader")
    try {
      db.getEntityManager().registerEntityClass(classOf[models.Package])
      val packages = db.query[util.List[models.Package]](new OSQLSynchQuery[models.Package]("select from Package")).asScala.toSeq
      Ok(Json.obj(
        "packages" -> Json.toJson(packages)
      ))
    }
    finally {
      db.close()
    }
  }
}

EDIT:

Specifically, I wish to use OrientDB's asynchronous API. I know that asynchronous queries are supported by the API, though I'm not sure if you can connect asynchronously as well.

Attempted Solution

Based on Jean's answer, I've tried the following asynchronous implementation, but it fails due to a compilation error value execute is not a member of Nothing possible cause: maybe a semicolon is missing before 'value execute'?:

def getPackages(): Future[Seq[models.Package]] = {
    val db = openDb
    try {
      val p = promise[Seq[models.Package]]
      val f = p.future
      db.command(
        new OSQLAsynchQuery[ODocument]("select from Package",
          new OCommandResultListener() {
            var acc = List[ODocument]()

            @Override
            def result(iRecord: Any): Boolean = {
              val doc = iRecord.asInstanceOf[ODocument]
              acc = doc :: acc
              true
            }

            @Override
            def end() {
              // This is just a dummy
              p.success(Seq[models.Package]())
            }
          // Fails
          })).execute()
      f
    }
    finally {
      db.close()
    }
}
share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

One way could be to start a promise, return the future representing the result of that promise, locally accumulate the results as they come and complete de promise ( thus resolving the future ) when orient db notifies you that the command has completed.

def executeAsync(osql: String, params: Map[String, String] = Map()): Future[List[ODocument]] = {
    import scala.concurrent._
    val p = promise[List[ODocument]]
    val f =p.future
    val req: OCommandRequest = database.command(
      new OSQLAsynchQuery[ODocument]("select * from animal where name = 'Gipsy'",
        new OCommandResultListener() {
          var acc = List[ODocument]()
          @Override
          def result(iRecord:Any):Boolean= {
            val doc = iRecord.asInstanceOf[ODocument]
            acc=doc::acc
            true
          }

          @Override
          def end() {
            p.success(acc)
          }
        }))
    req.execute()
    f
  }

Be careful though, to enable graph navigation and field lazy loading, orientdb objects used to keep an internal reference to the database instance they were loaded from ( or to depend on a threadlocal database connected instance ) for lazily loading elements from the database. Manipulating these objects asynchronously may result in loading errors. I haven't checked changes from 1.6 but that seemed to be deeply embedded in the design.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this looks promising. – aknuds1 Mar 4 '14 at 14:24
2  
as mentionned this accumulates things locally, if you don't want to accumulate in the OCommandResultListener, you might be able to plug this on an enumerator or a scalaz-stream but I don't know the apis for these well enough to suggest code – Jean Mar 4 '14 at 21:27
    
Thanks Jean, will try to adapt this when I've got the time (soon hopefully). – aknuds1 Mar 4 '14 at 21:38
    
I've tried to implement your solution, but it fails due to a compilation error. I've pasted the code at the bottom of my question. Any ideas as to what goes wrong? – aknuds1 Mar 4 '14 at 23:04
    
I think I've fixed the compilation error by specifying the return type of database.command. However, now it fails due to an exception IllegalStateException: Promise already completed.. – aknuds1 Mar 4 '14 at 23:21

It's as simple as wrapping the blocking call in a Future.

import play.api.libs.concurrent.Execution.Implicits.defaultContext
import scala.concurrent.Future

object Packages extends Controller {
  def packages = Action.async { implicit request  =>
    val db = OObjectDatabasePool.global().acquire("http://localhost:2480", "reader", "reader")
    db.getEntityManager().registerEntityClass(classOf[models.Package])

    val futureResult: Future[Result] = Future(
      db.query[util.List[models.Package]](new OSQLSynchQuery[models.Package]("select from Package")).asScala.toSeq
    ).map(
      queryResult => Ok(Json.obj("packages" -> Json.toJson(packages)))
    ).recover { 
      // Handle each of the exception cases legitimately
      case e: UnsupportedOperationException => UnsupportedMediaType(e.getMessage)
      case e: MappingException              => BadRequest(e.getMessage)
      case e: MyServiceException            => ServiceUnavailable(e.toString)
      case e: Throwable                     => InternalServerError(e.toString + "\n" + e.getStackTraceString) 
    }

    futureResult.onComplete { case _ => 
      db.close()
    }

    futureResult
  }
}

Note that I did not compile the code. There is a lot of room to improve the code.

share|improve this answer
    
I wish to use OrientDB's async API, rather than blocking a thread waiting on a synchronous query. – aknuds1 Mar 4 '14 at 6:45
    
I haven't used OrientDB.. but in the above approach you are not blocking a thread because Future object which contains the read handle to the data is immediately returned.. so its completely asynchronous. – Venkat Sudheer Reddy Aedama Mar 4 '14 at 6:49
    
Yes, the controller method returns immediately, but a thread must still block on the synchronous query, no? I'm new to Scala, but this is a well-known work-around for synchronous APIs. I know that OrientDB has an asynchronous API however, so it isn't necessary. – aknuds1 Mar 4 '14 at 7:10
    
I wrapped the blocking call in a Future. It's not blocking anymore. More over, if you are tying your application into OrientDB asynchronous API, you do not have a proper Data Access Layer abstraction ? – Venkat Sudheer Reddy Aedama Mar 4 '14 at 18:38
    
You realize that the query will block in another thread, right? The query is still synchronous, wrapping or no. – aknuds1 Mar 4 '14 at 20:01

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