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To declare a new composite type, we use the following syntax

type foo
    a::Int64
    b::Int64
end

and instantiate like such

x = foo(1,3)

Is there some way to have type attributes that always just a function of other attributes? For example, is there some way to do the following (which is invalid syntax)...

type foo
    a::Int64
    b::Int64
    c = a + b
end

My current workaround is just to define a function which calculates c and returns an instance of the type, like so...

type foo
    a::Int64
    b::Int64
    c::Int64
end

function foo_maker(a, b)
    return foo(a, b, a+b)
end

Is there a more elegant solution? Possibly one that can be contained within the type definition?

EDIT - 3/7/14

With Cristóvão's suggestion in mind, I've ended up declaring constructors like the following to allow for keyword args and attributes calculated upon instantiation

# Type with optional keyword argument structure
type LargeType

    # Declare all the attributes in order up top
    q::Int64
    w::Int64
    e::Int64
    r::Int64
    t::Int64
    y::Int64
    a::Number
    b::Number
    c::Number

    # Declare Longer constructor with stuff going on in the body
    LargeType(;q=1,w=1,e=1,r=1,t=1,y=1) = begin 
        # Large Constructor Example 
        a = round(r^t - log(pi))
        b = a % t
        c = a*b
        # Return new instance with correctly ordered arguments
        return new(q,w,e,r,t,y,a,b,c)
    end

end


println(LargeType(r=2,t=5))
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try this:

julia> type foo
           a::Int64
           b::Int64
           c::Int64
           foo(a::Int64, b::Int64) = new(a, b, a+b)
       end

julia> foo(1,2)
foo(1,2,3)

julia> foo(4,5,6)
no method foo(Int64, Int64, Int64)

However, that won't prevent one from manually changing a, b or c and rendering c inconsistent. To prevent that, if it presents no other problems, you can make foo immutable:

julia> immutable foo
           ...
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the suggestion, I actually had tried something similar. I defined the new constructor outside of the initial type declaration foo(a::Int64, b::Int64) = foo(a, b, a+b) Is there an advantage to keeping it inside? My understanding is that the use of new restricts the type to only that constructor –  Ben Southgate Mar 4 at 14:59
    
Yes, that's one of the advantages. See others here julia.readthedocs.org/en/latest/manual/constructors/…. –  Cristóvão D Sousa Mar 4 at 18:06

There isn't any way to do this currently, but there might be in the future:

https://github.com/JuliaLang/julia/issues/1974

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