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I am trying to create a instance of Show for haskell operator or functions, but I just can't figure it out how...

I tried

 instance (Show (+)) where
     show (+) = "+"

but of course, it doesn't work. Does anyone know how to do it?

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2  
(+) is not a type. Types can be instances but not values. –  David Young Mar 4 at 1:28
1  
possible duplicate of Show a list of functions in Haskell –  Daniel Wagner Mar 4 at 2:13
    
And from the possible duplicate: haskell.org/haskellwiki/Show_instance_for_functions –  Daniel Wagner Mar 4 at 2:13
    
And from the possible duplicate of the possible duplicate: Data.Universe.Instances.Show –  Daniel Wagner Mar 4 at 2:14
    
Yup, Show a list of functions in Haskell solves my problem, @DanielWagner –  Daivid Mar 4 at 3:17

1 Answer 1

This might not be what you're looking for, but it might be the closest you can get: we can always turn a typeclass signature into a concrete data type.

-- built it
class Num a where
  (+) :: a -> a -> a
  (*) :: a -> a -> a
  (-) :: a -> a -> a
  negate :: a -> a
  abs :: a -> a
  signum :: a -> a
  fromInteger :: Integer -> a


-- ours
data Num
  = Plus    Num Num
  | Mult    Num Num
  | Subt    Num Num
  | Neg     Num
  | Abs     Num
  | Signun  Num
  | FromInt Integer
deriving ( Show )

instance Num Num where
  (+) = Plus
  (-) = Subt
  (*) = Mult
  negate = Neg
  abs = Abs
  signum = Signum
  fromInteger = FromInt

And now we can use the deriving ( Show ) bit on our Num data type to see expressions.

>>> 3 + 2 :: Num
Plus (FromInt 3) (FromInt 2)

But generally there's no way much simpler than this to show Haskell functions or operators. Usually once you've gotten a value of a type like a -> b then the best thing you can do to examine it is to feed it as

instance Show a => Show (Bool -> a) where
  show f = "Fun { True -> " ++ show (f True) ++ ", False -> " ++ show (f False) ++ " }"

>>> id :: Bool -> Bool
Fun { True -> True, False -> False }

>>> not
Fun { True -> False, False -> True}
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