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I'm creating an object called 'Job', which i'm later going to want to sort ascending by how long each task will take (naming this variable "time"). In the class for job, i extended compareTo() as suggested by two tutorials, and now it looks like this;

public int compareTo(Job t) {
    int compare = ((Job) t).time; 
    return this.time - compare;
    }

or this;

public int compareTo(Job t) {
    return new Integer(getTime()).compareTo((t.getTime()));
    }

depending on which i comment out. Both implementations compile, but produce the same error, as follows.

In my main method, i made several jobs and added them to an array of jobs, Q[], also creating a int (length) to track how much of the array is non-null - how many actual jobs are in Q.

However, when i sort them with

Arrays.sort(Q, 0, length-1);

it only sorts until it finds that the 'next' object is larger than the current one. Here's a result from my last two tests, by (job name; job time):

jobA; 5,
jobB; 2,
jobC; 9,
jobD; 8.

sorting

jobB; 2,
jobA; 5,
jobC; 9,
jobD; 8.

jobA; 5
jobB; 2
jobC; 1
jobD; 8

sorting

jobC; 1
jobB; 2
jobA; 5
jobD; 8

I can provide more code if needed, but i'm not really doing anything else that should interact with this.

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3 Answers 3

First, neither of those compareTo methods are (completely) correct:

public int compareTo(Job t) {
    int compare = ((Job) t).time; 
    return this.time - compare;
}

If the time values can be negative, then the subtraction can overflow resulting in a number with the wrong sign.

public int compareTo(Job t) {
    return new Integer(getTime()).compareTo((t.getTime()));
}

It is unnecessary (and wasteful) create and Integer instance. Use the static Integer.compare(int, int) method instead.

But neither of those issues explain the results you are seeing.


My guess is that the real problem is simply that length - 1 is incorrect.

According to the javadoc, the 3rd parameter of the Array.sort(...) methods is an exclusive bound. If length really represents the length of Q ... or the number of entries in Q that are valid ... then you should use length as the 3rd argument.

(The clue is that it is only the last element that is incorrectly sorted in your examples.)

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They can't be negative, hence my, um, lazy programming there. Sort is run on a sanitized list of inputs. As to the latter one, i did see that that is more correct, but i don't know that i see which variables to use in Integer.compare(int, int). Would it be compare(getTime(), t.getTime())? –  user3377275 Mar 4 '14 at 3:31
    
@user3377275 - 1) The trouble with lazy programming is that it can come back to bite you. Or a co-worker. Though probably not in this case. 2) Yes it would be that. And note that the Integer.compare is both correct AND easier to read. –  Stephen C Mar 4 '14 at 3:34

Don't use int/Integer for time, use long/Long

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Error persists. Changed all instances of time to long/Long, and did this; public int compareTo(Job t){return new Long(getTime()).compareTo((t.getTime())); Can't change type of int compareTo(), not compatible with comparable<job> –  user3377275 Mar 4 '14 at 3:19
    
ok, that was a little bit of a long shot, but still I strongly recommend that you use long to avoid overflows, especially if you use the system time representation (e.g. System.currentTimeMillis() and derived). In your changed code, don't use new Long for the result of compareTo(), change your getTime() getters and the internal representation use long. The answer from @Stephen C below is just spot on, though. –  Patrice M. Mar 4 '14 at 3:32

You are calling Arrays.sort(a,fromIndex,toIndex) with the wrong toIndex:

You should call Arrays.sort(Q, 0, length);

Not Arrays.sort(Q, 0, length-1);

check: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/Arrays.html#sort(byte[], int, int)

The range to be sorted extends from the index fromIndex, inclusive, to the index toIndex, exclusive.

So you are letting the last element out of the sort.

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Ah. That explains matters. I had tried that but it cause a null pointer error - i must have fixed whatever was causing that error unintentionally and then assumed the indices were inclusive. –  user3377275 Mar 4 '14 at 3:26

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