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My goal is to take any pending Windows updates that are not explicitly called out in an exception list and dump them into a secondary UpdateCollection of updates that should be installed. My pseudo code looks like this:

String list containing KB numbers for updates that shouldn't be installed:

List<string> windowsUpdateExceptionKBList
KB1234567
KB2644615
KB483729

WUApiLib.UpdateCollection containing update objects

UpdateCollection securityUpdatesList
Iupdate object1
Iupdate object2

Each update object has a ".Title" property containing the KB number (e.g. Security Update for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2644615)). I need something like the following:

UpdateCollection securityUpdatestoInstall = new UpdateCollection();

foreach (Iupdate update in securityUpdatesList)
 {  
 foreach (string kB in windowsUpdateExceptionKBList)
    { 
        if (!update.Title **contains** kB)
           {
              securityUpdatestoInstall.Add(update);
           }
    }
 }

The above won't work as proposed because it will add duplicate updates to the list due to the nested foreach loops. But I'm having a hard time even conceptualizing how I can accomplish this in C#.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to take action if no match was found, so add a variable to track whether a match was found, and break out of the inner foreach on the first match, then conditionally add the update depending if a match was found:

UpdateCollection securityUpdatestoInstall = new UpdateCollection();

foreach (Iupdate update in securityUpdatesList)
{
    bool blacklisted = false;
    foreach (string kB in windowsUpdateExceptionKBList)
    { 
        if (update.Title.Contains(kB))
           {
              blacklisted = true;
              break;
           }
    }
    if (!blacklisted)
    {
         securityUpdatestoInstall.Add(update);
    }
 }

Also note that you can use string.Contains, so I've added that too (and notice that it's case sensitive).

share|improve this answer
    
That makes sense. Any comment on how I can perform the "contains" operation? –  user3342256 Mar 4 '14 at 6:28
    
There's a method for that. I've just added it in. –  Ergwun Mar 4 '14 at 6:30

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