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How to extract the value represented by a particular set of bits in a given number i.e. if bits 11,12 & 13 are 1,1,0 then the value should be 6.

What is the most efficient way of doing the same? Also, it should be generic. I should be able to give start and end bit positions and should be able to extract the value represented by the bits present between the start and end positions.

Ex: 00000000 00000000 01100000 00011111

For the above number, considering 0th bit is from the right end, if I give this number, 0 as starting position and 2 as end position, then I should get the value 7.

Also, how do we take care of endianness also for the above problem?

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1 Answer

up vote 6 down vote accepted
six = (value >> 12) & 7;

If you want to be generic,

inline unsigned extract_continuous_bits(unsigned value, int start, int end) {
    unsigned mask = (~0u) >> (CHAR_BIT*sizeof(value) - end - 1);
    return (value & mask) >> start;
}

assert(extract_continuous_bits(0x601f, 12, 14) == 6));
assert(extract_continuous_bits(0x601f, 0, 2) == 7));
assert(extract_continuous_bits(0xf0f0f0f0, 0, 31) == 0xf0f0f0f0));
assert(extract_continuous_bits(0x12345678, 16, 31) == 0x1234));
assert(extract_continuous_bits(0x12345678, 0, 15) == 0x5678));

And for endianness, see http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2213441/when-to-worry-about-endianness.

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I think (start+1) should just be start. And in the OP's initial example, 11, 12, & 13 should actually be 14, 13, & 12 with start = 12 and end = 14. That matches what they said later ("0th bit is from the right end") –  Matthew Flaschen Feb 7 '10 at 10:39
    
@Matthew: That makes sense. Updated. –  KennyTM Feb 7 '10 at 10:43
1  
Be warned that this has an edge case - it' not guaranteed to work if start and end specify the full width of the type (here, unsigned). –  caf Feb 8 '10 at 0:01
    
Good point, caf. That could be fixed with a special case. if(end == (sizeof(unsigned) * CHAR_BIT - 1) && start == 0) { return value; } –  Matthew Flaschen Feb 8 '10 at 6:26
1  
OK I've updated the code so that it can handle start=0, end=31 without special casing. –  KennyTM Feb 8 '10 at 8:19
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