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Some background

We have a system which optionally integrates to several other systems. Our system shuffles data from a MySQL database to the other systems. Different customers want different data transferred. In order to not trigger unnecessary transfers (when no relevant data has changed) to these external systems, we have an "export" table which contains all the information any customer is interested in and a service which runs SQL queries defined in a file to compare the data in the export table to the data in the other tables and update the export table as appropriate, a solution we're not really happy with for several reasons:

  • No customer uses more than a fraction of these columns, although each column is used by at least one customer.
  • As the database grows, the service is causing increasing amounts of strain on the system. Some servers completely freeze while this service compares data, which may take up to 2 minutes (!) even though no customer has particularly large amounts of data (~15000 rows across all relevant tables, max). We fear what might happen if we ever get a customer with very large amounts of data. Performance could be improved by creating some indexes and improving the SQL queries, but we feel like that's attacking the problem from the wrong direction.
  • It's not very flexible, nor scalable. Having to add new columns every time a customer is interested in transferring data that no other customer has been interested in before (which happens a lot), just feels... icky. I don't know how much it really matters, but we're up to 37 columns in this table at the moment, and it keeps growing.

What we want to do

Instead, we would like to have a very slimmed down "export" table which only contains the bare minimum information, i.e. the table and primary key of the row that was updated, the system this row should be exported to, and some timestamps. A trigger in every relevant table would then update this export table whenever a column that has been configured to warrant an update is updated. This configuration should be read from another table (which, sometime in the future, could be configured from our web GUI), looking something like this:

+--------+--------+-----------+
| system |  table |  column   |
+--------+--------+-----------+
| 'sys1' | 'tbl1' | 'column1' |
+--------+--------+-----------+
| 'sys2' | 'tbl1' | 'column2' |
+--------+--------+-----------+

Now, the trigger in tbl1 will read from this table when a row is updated. The configuration above should mean that if column1 in tbl1 has changed, then an export row for sys1 should be updated, if column2 has changed too, then an export row for sys2 should also be updated, etc.

So far, it all seems doable, although a bit tricky when you're not an SQL genius. However, we would preferably like to be able to define a little bit more complex conditions, at least something like "column3 = 'Apple' OR column3 = 'Banana'", and this is kind of the heart of the question...

So, to sum it up:

  • What would be the best way to allow for triggers to be configured in this way?
  • Are we crazy? Are triggers the right way to go here, or should we just stick to our service, smack on some indexes and suck it up? Or is there a third alternative?
  • How much of a performance increase could we expect to see? (Is this all worth it?)
share|improve this question
    
Hmm, I just found out that dynamic SQL is not allowed inside triggers... what a bummer. Guess it's back to the drawing board then. – moggizx Mar 4 '14 at 13:34
    
We have kind of concluded that the best approach would be to generate static triggers from PHP instead, which may have actually been the better solution to begin with. – moggizx Mar 4 '14 at 15:04

This is actually impossible because dynamic SQL is not supported in SQL. Therefore we came up with reading the config table from PHP and generating "static" triggers. We'll try having 2 tables, one for columns and one for conditions, like so:

Columns
+--------+--------+-----------+
| system |  table |  column   |
+--------+--------+-----------+
| 'sys1' | 'tbl1' | 'column1' |
+--------+--------+-----------+
| 'sys2' | 'tbl1' | 'column2' |
+--------+--------+-----------+

Conditions
+--------+--------+-------------------------------------------+
| system |  table |                  condition                |
+--------+--------+-------------------------------------------+
| 'sys1' | 'tbl1' | 'column3 = "Apple" OR column3 = "Banana"' |
+--------+--------+-------------------------------------------+

Then just build a statement like this in PHP (pseudo-code):

DROP TRIGGER IF EXISTS `tbl1_AUPD`;

CREATE TRIGGER `tbl1_AUPD` AFTER UPDATE ON tbl1 FOR EACH ROW
    BEGIN
    IF (*sys1 columns changed*) AND (*sys1 condition1*) THEN
        updateExportTable('sys1', 'tbl1', NEW.primary_key, NEW.timestamp);
    END IF;
    IF (*sys2 columns changed*) THEN
        updateExportTable('sys2', 'tbl1', NEW.primary_key, NEW.timestamp);
    END IF;
END;

This seems to be the best solution for us, maybe even better than what I was asking for, but if anyone has a better suggestion I'm all ears!

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