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in the C world, a function can return error code to represent the exit status, and use INOUT/OUT parameter to carry the actual fruit of the process. when it comes to xmlrpc, no INOUT/OUT parameter, is there any best practice/conventions to represent the exit status and actual result?

the context is i am trying to write an agent/daemon (python SimpleXMLRPCServer) running on the Server, and want to design the "protocol" to interact with it.

any advice is appreciated.

EDIT: per S.Lott's comment, make the problem more clear.

  • it is more about os convention rather than C convention. I agree with that.

  • the job of the agent is more or less run some cmd on the server, inherently with an exit code/result idiom

.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

One simple way to implement this in Python is with a tuple. Have your function return a tuple of: (status, result) where the status can be numeric or a string, and the result can be any Python data structure you fancy.

Here's an example, adapted from the module documentation. Server code:

from SimpleXMLRPCServer import SimpleXMLRPCServer
from SimpleXMLRPCServer import SimpleXMLRPCRequestHandler

# Restrict to a particular path.
class RequestHandler(SimpleXMLRPCRequestHandler):
    rpc_paths = ('/RPC2',)

# Create server
server = SimpleXMLRPCServer(("localhost", 8000),
                            requestHandler=RequestHandler)

def myfunction(x, y):
    status = 1
    result = [5, 6, [4, 5]]
    return (status, result)
server.register_function(myfunction)

# Run the server's main loop
server.serve_forever()

Client code:

import xmlrpclib

s = xmlrpclib.ServerProxy('http://localhost:8000')
print s.myfunction(2, 4)

The server function returns a tuple

share|improve this answer
    
i will start with this and refactor later if necessary. thanx. – Dyno Fu Feb 8 '10 at 2:20

"in the C world, a function can return error code to represent the exit status, and use INOUT/OUT parameter to carry the actual fruit of the process"

  1. Consider an exit status to be a hack. It's not a C-ism, it's a Linux-ism. C functions return exactly one value. C doesn't have exceptions, so there are several ways to indicate failure, all pretty bad.

    Exception handling is what's needed. Python and Java have this, and they don't need exit status.

    OS's however, still depend on exit status because shell scripting is still very primitive and some languages (like C) can't produce exceptions.

  2. Consider in/out variables also to be a hack. This is a terrible hack because the function has multiple side-effects in addition to returning a value.

Both of these "features" aren't really the best design patterns to follow.

Ideally, a function is "idempotent" -- no matter how many times you call it, you get the same results. In/Out variables break idempotency in obscure, hard-to-debug ways.

You don't really need either of these features, that's why you don't see many best practices for implementing them.

The best practice is to return a value or raise an exception. If you need to return multiple values you return a tuple. If things didn't work, you don't return an exit status, you raise an exception.


Update. Since the remote process is basically RSH to run a remote command, you should do what remctl does.

You need to mimic: http://linux.die.net/man/1/remctl precisely. You have to write a Python client and server. The server returns a message with a status code (and any other summary, like run-time). The client exits with that same status code.

share|improve this answer
    
You answer is insightful. The problem here is the job of the agent is more or less run some cmd on the server, inherently with an exit code/result idiom. to redefine Exceptions for all these things are not that practical. – Dyno Fu Feb 8 '10 at 2:18
    
@Dyno Fu: Update your question to state this. Since you're running a command (using OS conventions) you must package the OS results. The status code from OS commands has absolutely nothing at all to do with C functions or in/out arguments. Your question and this comment have almost nothing to do with each other. Please fix your question or remove this comment. – S.Lott Feb 8 '10 at 2:49
    
ok, you have your point. maybe i've tried to analog the problem in the wrong way. (exit code and the output as result) – Dyno Fu Feb 8 '10 at 8:11

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