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I have a query (including LinqKit) of the form:

Expression<Func<Country, DateTime, bool>> countryIndepBeforeExpr = 
  (ct, dt) => ct.IndependenceDate <= dt;
DateTime someDate = GetSomeDate();
var q = db.Continent.AsExpandable().Select(c =>
  new 
  {
    c.ID,
    c.Name,
    c.Area,
    Countries = c.Countries.AsQueryable()
                 .Where(ct => countryIndepBeforeExpr.Invoke(ct, someDate))
                 .Select(ct => new {ct.ID, ct.Name, ct.IndependenceDate})
  });

Now I want to iterate through q... but since the Countries property of each element is of type IQueryable, it will be lazy loaded, causing n+1 queries to be executed, which isn't very nice.

What is the correct way to write this query so that all necessary data will be fetched in a single query to the db?

EDIT

Hm, well it might have helped if I had actually run a Sql trace before asking this question. I assumed that because the inner property was of type IQueryable that it would be lazy-loaded... but after doing some actual testing, it turns out that Linq to Entities is smart enough to run the whole query at once.

Sorry to waste all your time. I would delete the question, but since it already has answers, I can't. Maybe it can serve as some kind of warning to others to test your hypothesis before assuming it to be true!

share|improve this question
    
This really has more to do with the Linq provider than Linq itself. You should probably tag this question with the appropriate provider (EF, Linq-to-SQL, etc.). –  Ocelot20 Mar 4 '14 at 14:30
    
Why do you reference countries in a continent object? Shouldn't it be the other way around? It would be much simpler for the request. You gather all the countries from countryIndepBeforeExpr then select the continents and do whatever you want to do. –  Keysharpener Mar 4 '14 at 14:32
    
@Ocelot20 - added tags –  Shaul Behr Mar 4 '14 at 14:32
    
@keysharpener - don't be distracted by the particular implementation. My project has nothing to do with geography; I'm just using the continent/country relationship to make it intuitively obvious to you what I'm trying to do without having to explain the business rules of my project domain. –  Shaul Behr Mar 4 '14 at 14:34
    
You can make this much simpler by capturing the someDate variable in the expression, which will then become a Expression<Func<Country,bool>> that you can use as Where(countryIndepBeforeExpr ), without LinqKit. It will probably also get the countries in one query. I also think you left out too much, because the expression has apparently been compiled, and when I use AsExpandable() this way I get the infamous "LINQ to Entities does not recognize the method". –  Gert Arnold Mar 4 '14 at 15:11

2 Answers 2

Include countries to your model when you call for continents. With something like this:

var continents = db.Continent.Include(c => c.Countries).ToArray();

Then you can make your linq operations without iQueryable object.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 fair suggestion, but it has the unwanted side effect of dragging along all data from the Country records. I only want a small number of fields. And perhaps I'll also want to take some data from tables to which Country has a FK... if I start including all related tables, it's going to get ugly. –  Shaul Behr Mar 4 '14 at 14:49
    
@Shaul If you wanna avoid both problems (retrieve all which is needed => no n+1, but not more that what's is needed => no Include), I don't see any other solution than using anonymous types or probably rather "ViewModel" classes (well custom "non-entity" classes), and select only what you need... –  Raphaël Althaus Mar 4 '14 at 17:11
    
@RaphaëlAlthaus, my original assumption was wrong, check out my edit... –  Shaul Behr Mar 5 '14 at 10:08

I think this should work (moving AsExpandable() to root of IQueryable):

var q = db.Continent
          .AsExpandable()
          .Select(c => new 
          {
              c.ID,
              c.Name,
              c.Area,
              Countries = c.Countries
                  .Where(ct => countryIndepBeforeExpr.Invoke(ct, someDate))
                  .Select(ct => new {ct.ID, ct.Name, ct.IndependenceDate})
});

If not, create two IQueryable and join them together:

var continents = db.Continents;
var countries = db.Countries
                  .AsExpandable()
                  .Where(c => countryIndepBeforeExpr.Invoke(c, someDate))
                  .Select(c => new { c.ID, c.Name, c.IndependenceDate });

var q = continents.GroupJoin(countries,
    continent => continent.ID,
    country => country.ContinentId,
    (continent, countries) => new
    {
        continent.ID,
        continent.Name,
        continent.Area,
        Countries = countries.Select(c => new
        {
            c.ID,
            c.Name,
            c.IndependenceDate
        })
    });
share|improve this answer
    
Silly me, check out my edit. –  Shaul Behr Mar 5 '14 at 10:07

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