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I've been using the bash command line with grep -e and sort -nr trying to filter and analyze some lines coming from a bunch of "data" files. So far I came out with an output file like this:

 25 The X value is: bla bla bla done
 19 The X value is: foo done
 19 The X value is: bar done
 19 The X value is: bbb done
 19 The X value is: xxx yyy zzz done

where you can see the frequency and the "data" part I am interested into.

I am not able to find a regex to be used by grep to "clean those lines". I mean: I can intercept those "data" lines with a regex like is:.*done (I know this pattern is unique in the files I am analyzing), but how can I clean those lines extracting exactly the stuff between "is:" and "done"?

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3  
grep won't do that for you. Look at cut, which removes columns by position or delimiter, or sed, which removes regexs. –  Lencho Reyes Mar 4 '14 at 14:49
    
Do you need frequency and part between is: and done both in output? –  anubhava Mar 4 '14 at 14:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try sed instead:

$ sed -r 's/^.*: (.*) done$/\1/' outputfile.txt

bla bla bla
foo
bar
bbb
xxx yyy zzz
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If you wanted to return:

bla bla bla
foo
bar
bbb
xxx yyy zzz

you can use

(?<=:)(.*)(?=done)
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