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I've got a class which consists of two strings and an enum. I'm trying to use instances of this class as keys in a dictionary. Unfortunately I don't seem to be implementing IEquatable properly. Here's how I've done it:

public enum CoinSide
{
    Heads,
    Tails
}

public class CoinDetails : IComparable, IEquatable<CoinDetails>
{
    private string denomination;
    private string design;
    private CoinSide side;

//...

    public int GetHashCode(CoinDetails obj)
    {
        return string.Concat(obj.Denomination, obj.Design, obj.Side.ToString()).GetHashCode();
    }

    public bool Equals(CoinDetails other)
    {
        return (this.Denomination == other.Denomination && this.Design == other.Design && this.Side == other.Side);
    }
}

However, I still can't seem to look up items in my dictionary. Additionally, the following tests fail:

    [TestMethod]
    public void CoinDetailsHashCode()
    {
        CoinDetails a = new CoinDetails("1POUND", "1997", CoinSide.Heads);
        CoinDetails b = new CoinDetails("1POUND", "1997", CoinSide.Heads);
        Assert.AreEqual(a.GetHashCode(), b.GetHashCode());
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void CoinDetailsCompareForEquality()
    {
        CoinDetails a = new CoinDetails("1POUND", "1997", CoinSide.Heads);
        CoinDetails b = new CoinDetails("1POUND", "1997", CoinSide.Heads);
        Assert.AreEqual<CoinDetails>(a, b);
    }

Would someone be able to point out where I'm going wrong? I'm sure I'm missing something rather simple, but I'm not sure what.

share|improve this question
    
You haven't overridden bool Equals(object) which is probably why the tests are failing. I'd expect the dictionary to be okay though. If you could show a short but complete program demonstrating the problem, that would be helpful. –  Jon Skeet Mar 4 at 14:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You class has to override Equals and GetHashCode:

public class CoinDetails 
{
    private string Denomination;
    private string Design;
    private CoinSide Side;

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        CoinDetails c2 = obj as CoinDetails;
        if (c2 == null)
            return false;
        return Denomination == c2.Denomination && Design == c2.Design;
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        unchecked
        {
            int hash = 17;
            hash = hash * 23 + (Denomination ?? "").GetHashCode();
            hash = hash * 23 + (Design ?? "").GetHashCode();
            return hash;
        }
    }
}

Note that i've also improved your GetHashCode algorithm according to: What is the best algorithm for an overridden System.Object.GetHashCode?

You could also pass a custom IEqualityComparer<CoinDetail> to the dictionary:

public class CoinComparer : IEqualityComparer<CoinDetails>
{
    public bool Equals(CoinDetails x, CoinDetails y)
    {
        if (x == null || y == null) return false;
        if(object.ReferenceEquals(x, y)) return true;
        return x.Denomination == y.Denomination && x.Design == y.Design;
    }

    public int GetHashCode(CoinDetails obj)
    {
        unchecked
        {
            int hash = 17;
            hash = hash * 23 + (obj.Denomination ?? "").GetHashCode();
            hash = hash * 23 + (obj.Design ?? "").GetHashCode();
            return hash;
        }
    }                      
}

Now this works and does not require CoinDetails to override Equals+GetHashCode:

var dict = new Dictionary<CoinDetails, string>(new CoinComparer());
dict.Add(new CoinDetails("1POUND", "1997"), "");
dict.Add(new CoinDetails("1POUND", "1997"), ""); // FAIL!!!!
share|improve this answer
    
I removed the IEquatable reference and changed the methods to overrides, which allowed the program to run correctly. I'm now reading that "best hash code" post and will probably make changes accordingly. Thank you very much! –  user2823789 Mar 4 at 15:09
    
@user2823789: note that i've also edited my answer to provide another approach that does not require to modify the class itself. –  Tim Schmelter Mar 4 at 15:12
    
Yes, I noticed. However, I think I'll stick with overriding them. Also, interestingly, 23 is apparently a bad choice for one of the primes in the improved hashcode algorithm, as: "23 is no good choice, since(as of .net 3.5 SP1) Dictionary<TKey,TValue> assumes good distribution modulo certain primes. And 23 is one of them. So if you have a dictionary with Capacity 23 only the last contribution to GetHashCode influences the compound hashcode. So I'd rather use 29 instead of 23." Nevertheless, you've been extremely helpful, so thank you. –  user2823789 Mar 4 at 15:18
    
@user2823789: "If you've got a dictionary that small, it's unlikely to matter much." (J. Skeet) ;-) –  Tim Schmelter Mar 4 at 15:27
    
That is a very good point. –  user2823789 Mar 4 at 15:37

IEquatable does nothing for Dictionaries. You either want to override object.Equals(object o) and object.GetHashCode() or create the dictionary with a custom IEqualityComparer<CoinDetails>

If you want to override just change your code slightly:

public override int GetHashCode()
{
    return string.Concat(this.Denomination, this.Design, this.Side.ToString()).GetHashCode();
}

public override bool Equals(object other)
{
    CoinDetails cd = other as CoinDetails;
    if(cd == null) return false;

    return (this.Denomination == cd.Denomination 
         && this.Design == cd.Design 
         && this.Side == cd.Side);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ahah, I see. I removed the IEquatable interface and changed the methods to overrides, which worked. Thank you! –  user2823789 Mar 4 at 15:07
    
IEquatable does nothing for Dictionaries - that is not true. As documented, If type TKey implements the System.IEquatable<T> generic interface, the default equality comparer uses that implementation. What is missing from the documentation is that you also need to override GetHashCode for IEquatable to begin working. All that is however documented in the IEquatable<T> documentation. –  GSerg Nov 13 at 13:09

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