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This time I have a breeze question :)

Why is breeze not joining up the related objects. The appropriate data is returned from the repository method on the server. You see can from my fiddler data the client is receiving the data.

It's my understanding that you do not have to manually call "extend" method on the client side query if the data is returned from the server.

The object relationship is

1) An Item can have many Units 2) An Unit can relate to many Items

Copied from Breezejs.com documentation

Omitting navigation properties Sometimes you want to omit a navigation property one side of an association. For example, you may have Person.Gender but you don't want Gender.Persons; there is no good reason to navigate from the "Male" gender entity to all male Persons and no reason to incur the overhead of updating an observable array for that navigation. Fortunately, you can omit the navigation property on the principle side of the association. The Gender is the principal in this example so you can omit Gender.Persons.

--DB TABLE STRUCTURE

   CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Item](
 [Id] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
 [Name] [varchar](50) NOT NULL,
 [DisplayOrder] [int] NOT NULL
    )

   CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Unit](
 [Id] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
 [Acronym] [varchar](10) NULL,
 [Name] [varchar](50) NULL,
 [DisplayOrder] [int] NULL
     )

    CREATE TABLE [dbo].[AvailableUnit](
  [ItemId] [int] NOT NULL,
  [UnitId] [int] NOT NULL,
    CONSTRAINT [PK_AvailableUnit] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
    ([ItemId] ASC,[UnitId] ASC
     )

-- EF 6 Maps

  public class ItemMap : EntityTypeConfiguration<Item> {

    public ItemMap ( ) {
        ToTable( "Item" );
        HasKey( k => new {  k.Id } );

        Property( p => p.Id ).HasColumnName( "Id" );
        Property( p => p.Name ).HasColumnName( "Name" ).HasMaxLength( 50 );
        Property( p => p.DisplayOrder ).HasColumnName( "DisplayOrder" );

        HasMany( t => t.Units )
            .WithMany( )
            .Map( m => {
                      m.ToTable( "AvailableUnit" );
                      m.MapLeftKey( "ItemId" );
                      m.MapRightKey( "UnitId" );
                  } );
     }

  }

public class UnitMap : EntityTypeConfiguration<Unit> {
    public UnitMap( ) {
        ToTable( "Unit" );
        HasKey( k => new { k.Id } );
        Property( p => p.Id ).HasColumnName( "Id" );
        Property( p => p.Acronym ).HasColumnName( "Acronym"   ).HasMaxLength(10).IsRequired();
        Property( p => p.Name ).HasColumnName( "Name" ).HasMaxLength( 50 );
        Property( p => p.DisplayOrder ).HasColumnName( "DisplayOrder" );
    }
} 

--Sample Class

 public class Item {

    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int? DisplayOrder { get; set; }

    public virtual List<Unit> Units { get; set; }

    public Item( ) { }
}

public class Unit {

    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Acronym { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int? DisplayOrder { get; set; }

    public Unit() { }
}

--- Repository Method

    public IQueryable<Items> Items {
        get {
            return Context.Items
                .Include( i => i.Units );
        }
    }

---- JSON FROM FIDDLER

 [
  {
    "$id": "1",
    "$type": "MyProject.Core.Item, MyProject.Core",
    "Id": 1,
    "Name": "Alprostadil",
    "Units": [
    {
       "$id": "8",
       "$type": "MyProject.Core.Unit, MyProject.Core",
       "Id": 1,
       "Acronym": "U1",
       "Name": "Unit 1",
       "DisplayOrder": 10
    },
    {
       "$id": "9",
       "$type": "MyProject.Core.Unit, MyProject.Core",
       "Id": 2,
       "Acronym": "U2",
       "Name": "Unit 2",
       "DisplayOrder": 20
  },
  {
       "$id": "10",
       "$type": "MyProject.Core.Unit, MyProject.Core",
       "Id": 3,
       "Acronym": "U3",
       "Name": "Unit 3",
       "DisplayOrder": 30
  },
  {
        "$id": "11",
        "$type": "MyProject.Core.Unit, MyProject.Core",
        "Id": 4,
        "Acronym": "U4",
        "Name": "Unit 4",
        "DisplayOrder": 40
  }
],    
  "DisplayOrder": 10
 }
]

-- Hot Towel methods from Abstract Repository

       function _getById(entityName, id, forceRemote) {
           var self = this;
           var manager = self.manager;
           if (!forceRemote) {
            // check cache first
            var entity = manager.getEntityByKey(entityName, id);
            if (entity && !entity.isPartial) {
                self.log('Retrieved [' + entityName + '] id:' + entity.id + ' from  cache.', entity, true);
                if (entity.entityAspect.entityState.isDeleted()) {
                    entity = null; // hide session marked-for-delete
                }
                return $q.when(entity);
            }
        }

        // Hit the server
        // It was not found in cache, so let's query for it.
        return manager.fetchEntityByKey(entityName, id)
            .to$q(querySucceeded, self._queryFailed);

        function querySucceeded(data) {
            entity = data.entity;
            if (!entity) {
                self.log('Could not find [' + entityName + '] id:' + id, null, true);
                return null;
            }
            entity.isPartial = false;
            self.log('Retrieved [' + entityName + '] id ' + entity.id
                + ' from remote data source', entity, true);
            self.zStorage.save();
            return entity;
        }
    }
share|improve this question
    
Can you show your Unit class? –  PW Kad Mar 4 at 16:52
    
Yup just added them :) Thanks for looking –  GregL Mar 4 at 16:55

3 Answers 3

My turn :-)

  • Item and Unit are two ordinary entity classes, mapped to separate database tables.

  • Therefore Unit is not a complex type and that is not the issue.

  • You neglected to call out the "AvailableUnit" table which implements the relational many-to-many association between Item and Unit.

    HasMany( t => t.Units )
        .WithMany( )
        .Map( m => {
                  m.ToTable( "AvailableUnit" );
                  m.MapLeftKey( "ItemId" );
                  m.MapRightKey( "UnitId" );
              } );
    
  • Breeze does not support many-to-many associations. The feature request has many votes in our user voice. Add your vote.

  • You can (as you've discovered) send the related Units from the server to the client in the payload. The nested Units are in cache ... you can find them there. But Breeze won't populate the Item.Units array for you and won't maintain it for you. Those tasks fall to you.

  • We have long recommended a different approach. We ask you to expose the mapping/linking as an independent entity such as AvailableUnit. Then you'll be able to walk the path Item.AvailableUnit.Unit.

  • You will have to manage the link entities (AvailableUnit) yourself. Breeze documentation describes one way to display and manage many-to-many scenarios that are defined in this manner.

I suspect this is not the answer you want to hear. It's the way it is.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you all for the replies, they are much appreciated!!! No matter the answer :)... I don't mind changing my entites to fit breeze. I will take the hit for the rest of the benefits offered by breeze. I really just need to store a list of selected items from a list of lookup values. So if this is how it is right now that's the way it is. Thanks ward I have not seen that sample but will study it tonight and place my vote :) –  GregL Mar 5 at 1:20
    
What's your wireframe for the UX. Draw it on a napkin. Describe it. Use case it. Then we can talk. –  Ward Mar 5 at 6:34
    
Ok so here is a fiddler from a previous question I posted. This is the UX related to this question (Use case is at the top of the fiddler). UI Demo –  GregL Mar 5 at 13:33
    
Hi Ward, I'm really curious to hear why you say a many to many relationship is bad in EF.. I've always done this kind of data requirement like this. If there is a betterway.. PLEASE share :) Check out my fiddler in the above comment. To see what I have to accomplish. –  GregL Mar 6 at 16:19
    
In brief, an EF many-to-many association almost inevitably attracts the need for another property (isActive, linkCreatedDate, tenantId) which instantly busts the sleight of hand that is EF m-to-m. You have to fallback to the three-entity pattern that I say you should have written in the first places. Except now it's hard to retrofit, you don't have the time or budget, so you throw in some hack to hold the required information elsewhere. Hilarity ensues. It's a ticking time bomb. –  Ward Mar 7 at 3:15

GregL, The one side of a one to many is the principal side the Breeze documentation is describing. So if you compare your data model to the example the Breeze documentation is using, Item <==> Person, Unit <==> Gender. So you want to omit the other side of the relationship, which I don't think Breeze can handle because it needs either a foreign key property or a navigation property on the "many" side type to know how to relate it to the "one" side type. With just a collection of Units it doesn't know what property on those objects to use to form a relationship to the Item.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Brian, Thank you very much for the reply. Been trying to get this to work all day. What would be the best way to implement a Root Object With a list of "selected" look up values. So if I understand this I need to have navigation properties on both the Item and the unit? –  GregL Mar 5 at 0:28
    
I moved the DB definition and the EF mapping objects to the top of the question, to make it easier to read the important parts. Am I wrong in thinking Breeze would support this structure? –  GregL Mar 5 at 0:35

Your Unit class appears to be missing a navigation property that links it to the Item. Add the following property to your Unit class -

public class Unit {

    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Acronym { get; set; }
    public int ItemId { get; set; }
    public int? DisplayOrder { get; set; }

    public virtual Item Item { get; set; }

    public Unit( ) { }
}

This let's Breeze know when your Unit's are materialized which Item they belong to.

Edit

Sorry I missed in the title of the question where you said that the Unit was a complex type. A complex type does not have an Id as a key - I believe you need to remove the ID from the Unit to have EF define it as a complex type, or at least use a non-conventional way of supplying an Id

public class Unit {

    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Acronym { get; set; }
    public int? DisplayOrder { get; set; }

    public Unit( ) { }
}
share|improve this answer
    
The nesting is just telling Breeze what type of entity to expect - you could always override that property on the client and set up the id and the association but that is way too much work - out of curiosity what worries you about creating the association? –  PW Kad Mar 4 at 17:17
    
I don't need to go from Unit -> Item. So just wanted to keep the object as clean as possible.. There is some documentation from breeze's site I pasted into my question. What do you think? –  GregL Mar 4 at 17:28
    
The text you are referencing is saying you can omit the Unit.Item association, not the other way around. –  PW Kad Mar 4 at 17:30
    
Can you show the updated models? Oh crap Actually is your metadata showing that Unit is a complex type? I completely missed that from the question title... –  PW Kad Mar 4 at 17:49
    
Added table structure as well. Changed bad wording in title :) –  GregL Mar 4 at 18:22

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