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I have an array like

@tmp = ('value1-1', 'value1-2', 'value1-3', '', 'value2-1', 'value2-2', 'value2-3')

How to split array into 2 parts after seeing that value is empty '' ?

So that the output should be like this

@value1=('value1-1','value1-2','value1-3');
@value2=('value2-1','value2-2','value2-3');

I've tried this way

foreach $item(@tmp){
    unless($add == ''){
         #print $add;
         push (@value,$add);
    }
}

it doesn't return anything

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5  
You get warnings if you use warnings; –  toolic Mar 4 '14 at 17:49
    
I see 2 problems with your example. 1. Your iterator variable is $item but you're pushing a different variable $add onto the array. 2. Yo're only pushing onto one array. You can't push onto one array and expect the values to go to 2 arrays. –  benrifkah Mar 4 '14 at 18:19

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Loop through the list while using an array reference to decide which target array you're populating.

my @value1;
my @value2;

my @tmp = ('value1-1', 'value1-2', 'value1-3', '', 'value2-1', 'value2-2', 'value2-3');

my $target = \@value1;
for my $val ( @tmp ) {
    if ( $val eq '' ) {
        $target = \@value2;
    }
    else {
        push( @{$target}, $val );
    }
}  
share|improve this answer
    
Neat, but moving one element at a time is very slow. –  Borodin Mar 4 '14 at 18:10
1  
I don't see that being a problem. –  Andy Lester Mar 4 '14 at 18:54

The only way to do this is to search for the first blank element. You can do it conveniently using the firstidx function from List::MoreUtils like this

use strict;
use warnings;

use List::MoreUtils 'firstidx';

my @tmp = ('value1-1', 'value1-2', 'value1-3', '', 'value2-1', 'value2-2', 'value2-3');

my $i = firstidx { length == 0 } @tmp;
my @value2 = @tmp;
my @value1 = splice @value2, 0, $i;
shift @value2;

use Data::Dump;
dd \@value1, \@value2;

output

(
  ["value1-1", "value1-2", "value1-3"],
  ["value2-1", "value2-2", "value2-3"],
)

The module isn't a core module so you may prefer not to install it. You can write your own helper function with

sub first_blank_idx {
  my ($arr) = @_;
  length $arr->[$_] or return $_ for 0 .. $#$arr;
  return -1;
}

and change the call to firstidx to my $i = first_blank_idx(\@tmp)

share|improve this answer
use strict;
use warnings;

my @tmp = ('value1-1', 'value1-2', 'value1-3', '', 'value2-1', 'value2-2', 'value2-3');

my @blanks = grep {$tmp[$_] eq ''} 0 .. $#tmp;

die "No blank elements" unless @blanks;
warn "More than one blank" if @blanks > 1;

my @value1 = @tmp[0 .. $blanks[0]-1];
my @value2 = @tmp[$blank[0]+1 .. $#tmp];

use Data::Dump;
dd \@value1, \@value2;
share|improve this answer

You can use part from List::MoreUtils to partition an array:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use Data::Dumper;
use List::MoreUtils qw(part);

my @array = (
    'foo', 'bar', 'baz', '',
    'alpha', 'beta', 'gamma', '',
    'apple', 'pear', 'banana'
);

my $index = 1;
my @parts = part { $_ eq '' ? $index++ && 0 : $index } @array;

print Dumper \@parts;

Output:

$VAR1 = [
          [
            '',
            ''
          ],
          [
            'foo',
            'bar',
            'baz'
          ],
          [
            'alpha',
            'beta',
            'gamma'
          ],
          [
            'apple',
            'pear',
            'banana'
          ]
        ];

As you can see from the example, this will work for any number of partitions, not just two. The results are stored in an array of arrays, with the empty records (''), stored in $array[0].

share|improve this answer

You could use split and join to do that pretty concisely:

use strict; 
use warnings; 

my @tmp = 
   ('value1-1', 'value1-2', 'value1-3', '', 'value2-1', 'value2-2', 'value2-3');

# note that since the pivot value is empty there with be two && in its place
# we can split on that
my ($values1, $values2) = 
   map { [split '&', $_] } split('&&', join('&', @tmp));

__END__
[
   'value1-1',
   'value1-2',
   'value1-3'
],
[
   'value2-1',
   'value2-2',
   'value2-3'
]
share|improve this answer

As Andy Lester points out in his comment, an item-by-item filtering of the original @tmp array is probably fast enough unless the array is huge.

If the Perl 5 installation is version 14 or later then push accepts an array reference as its first parameter, so the switch between arrays can be written neatly using a state variable like this

use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.014;

my @tmp = ('value1-1', 'value1-2', 'value1-3', '', 'value2-1', 'value2-2', 'value2-3');

my (@value1, @value2);
my $split;

for (@tmp) {
  if (length or $split) {
    push $split ? \@value2 : \@value1, $_;
  }
  else {
    $split = 1;
  }
}

use Data::Dump;
dd \(@value1, @value2);

output

(
  ["value1-1", "value1-2", "value1-3"],
  ["value2-1", "value2-2", "value2-3"],
)

On earlier versions the array must be dereferenced, so the push call would become

push @{ $split ? \@value2 : \@value1 }, $_;
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