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I saw this line from a tutorial on Perl:

$ret = (($i, $j, $k)=(5,6,8,9)); # 4

I'm not familiar with the format to have multiple ='s signs in one line. From what I read it has something to do with context.

It seems strange to me to wrap ($i, $j, $k)=(5,6,8,9) with another pair of parentheses, but I'll take it as interpreting the wrapped text in list context.

But then, why is the following different? Doesn't the = () = mean the same thing? Why does the assignment take place before the list context does?

$ret = () = ($i, $j, $k)=(5,6,8,9); # 3

and yet the following is 4 again?

$ret = ($i, $j, $k)=(5,6,8,9); # 4 
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1 Answer 1

A common misconception is that the following assigns a to b:

b = a = 3

But you wouldn't expect the following to assign a to b, right?

b = a + 3

You have to look at what = evaluates to (returns).

As per Mini-Tutorial: Scalar vs List Assignment Operator,

  • A list assignment in list context evaluates to the scalars returned by its LHS as lvalues.
  • A list assignment in scalar context evaluates to the number of scalars returned by its RHS.

Assignments have right-to-left associativity, so

 $ret = () = ($i, $j, $k) = (5, 6, 8, 9);

means

       3       2                1
  $ret = ( ()  = ( ($i, $j, $k) = (5, 6, 8, 9) ));
  1. The first assignment operator is a list assignment in list context. It evaluates to the scalars returned by its LHS as lvalues ($i, $j, $k).
  2. The second assignment operator is a list assignment in scalar context. It evaluates to the number of scalars returned by its RHS (3).
  3. The third assignment operator assigns this to $ret.

Similarly

 $ret = ($i, $j, $k) = (5, 6, 8, 9);

means

      2                1
 $ret = ( ($i, $j, $k) = (5, 6, 8, 9) );
  1. The second assignment operator is a list assignment in scalar context. It evaluates to the number of scalars returned by its RHS (4).
  2. The second assignment operator assigns this to $ret.
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Referring to $ret = ( () = ( ($i, $j, $k) = (5, 6, 8, 9) ));, I don't understand why #2 is a "list assignment in scalar context", particularly why it's in scalar context. () = ($i, $j, $k). Both the lhs and rhs here look like lists. –  imagineerThat Mar 4 '14 at 22:40
    
Because #3 is a scalar assignment, and the scalar assignment imposes a scalar context on its arguments (LHS = $ret, RHS = #2) –  ikegami Mar 4 '14 at 23:08

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