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Consider:

object implicitnull extends App {
  mymethod

  implicit val arg = "foo"

  def mymethod(implicit arg: String) = {
    arg.size
  }
}

This does not cause any compilation error, however, at runtime results in NullPointerException coming from arg.size.

Is this the intended behavior?

share|improve this question
    
this can be incredibly annoying when stacking traits – drstevens Mar 4 '14 at 21:37
up vote 8 down vote accepted

Yes it's the intended behavior due to the way Scala constructs classes and initializes them. Consider this example:

scala> class A {
     |   f
     | 
     |   implicit val arg = "foo"
     | 
     |   def f(implicit arg: String) = {
     |     println(arg)
     |   }
     | }
defined class A

scala> class B {
     |   f(arg)
     | 
     |   val arg = "foo"
     | 
     |   def f(implicit arg: String) = {
     |     println(arg)
     |   }
     | }
defined class B

scala> class C {
     |   implicit val arg = "foo"
     | 
     |   f
     | 
     |   def f(implicit arg: String) = {
     |     println(arg)
     |   }
     | }
defined class C

scala> new A
null
res0: A = A@67d3caf

scala> new B
null
res1: B = B@3f2c5ad4

scala> new C
foo
res2: C = C@177bdd23

At the moment the function f is invoked in class C the value has been initialized, while in class B it has been not initialized yet. Class A is exactly the same as class B - the only difference is that Scala passes the arg implicitly in A.

It's a little bit confusing because this code is doing 2 things - it's declaring member variables and executing constructor code. If you take class B for example, val arg would be declared at the point where f is called, but not initialized yet. val arg = "foo" does the initialization. Once you translate this to Java it becomes more obvious:

public class B {

    void f(String arg) {
        System.out.println(arg);
    }

    String arg; // also acts as final in Scala

    public B() {
        f(arg);
        arg = "foo";
    }
}

Using lazy val or correct initialization order will help to fix it:

scala> class B {
     |   f(arg)
     | 
     |   lazy val arg = "foo"
     | 
     |   def f(implicit arg: String) = {
     |     println(arg)
     |   }
     | }
defined class B

scala> new B
foo
res3: B = B@3f9ac6e6
share|improve this answer
2  
You get a warning in 2.11. You can make it lazy val to fix it. – som-snytt Mar 4 '14 at 21:00
    
Updated my answer to include lazy val example – Aleksey Izmailov Mar 4 '14 at 21:06
1  
things do get weird if you use traits and more complex scenarios. One other fix is to use def when appropriate. – Aleksey Izmailov Mar 4 '14 at 21:07
    
Why wouldn't it trigger a compilation error? It's obvious that there's no meaningful implicit value defined yet for the call, yet it compiles fine. – Erik Allik Mar 4 '14 at 22:57
    
Well technically it's defined but not assigned/initialized. – Aleksey Izmailov Mar 5 '14 at 2:26

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