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This question Why can I call a non-constexpr function inside a constexpr function? presented the following code Please see the update for a better sample of the problem. The original piece of code has a mix of issues which muddies the picture:

#include <stdio.h>

constexpr int f()
{
    return printf("a side effect!\n");
}

int main()
{
    char a[f()];
    printf("%zd\n", sizeof a);
}

Which as I answer is ill-formed but gcc 4.8.2 allows it (see it live).

But, if we use the -fno-builtin flag gcc generates an error (see it live):

error: call to non-constexpr function 'int printf(const char*, ...)'
     return printf("a side effect!\n");
                                     ^

so it seems that gcc is considering its builtin version of printf to be a constant expression. gcc documents builtins here but does not document this case where a builtin of a non-constexpr function can be considered a constant expression.

If this is indeed the case:

  • Is a compiler allowed to to do this?
  • If they are allowed, don't they have to document it to be conformant?
  • Can this be considered an extension, if so, it seems like this would require a warning as the C++ draft standard section 1.4 Implementation compliance paragraph 8 says (emphasis mine):

A conforming implementation may have extensions (including additional library functions), provided they do not alter the behavior of any well-formed program. Implementations are required to diagnose programs that use such extensions that are ill-formed according to this International Standard. Having done so, however, they can compile and execute such programs.

Update

As Casey points out there are a few things going on in the original problem that makes it a poor example. A simple example would be using std::pow which is not a constexpr function:

#include <cmath>
#include <cstdio>

constexpr double f()
{
    return std::pow( 2.0, 2.0 ) ;
}

int main()
{
    constexpr double x = f() ;

    printf( "%f\n", x ) ;
}

Compiles and builds with no warnings or error (see it live) but adding -fno-builtin makes it generates an error (see it live). Note: why math functions are not constexpr in C++11:

error: call to non-constexpr function 'double pow(double, double)'
     return std::pow( 2.0, 2.0 ) ;
                               ^
share|improve this question
1  
What exactly do you think gcc violates here? Isn't it [dcl.constexpr]/5 "For a constexpr function, if no function argument values exist such that the function invocation substitution would produce a constant expression (5.19), the program is ill-formed; no diagnostic required."? –  dyp Mar 4 at 22:53
1  
Note: I don't quite understand why you say "gcc 4.8.2 allows it" when gcc rejects it, the invocation f() being not a constant expression. What it doesn't reject however is the definition of the function f itself, for which AFAIK, no diagnostic is required. –  dyp Mar 4 at 22:56
    
I'm not convinced it treats the built-in as a constant expression. You didn't provide an example that proves it (and the invocation of f(), leading to invocation of printf("a side effect!\n") is not considered a constant expression). –  dyp Mar 4 at 23:02
    
@dyp that is why I purposely used the word seems as opposed to prove but the behavior is consistent across the builtins and gcc does produce an error when not using a builtin. So it seems much more likely they are just considering the builtins to be constant expressions which seems odd. This conversation I just found sounds pretty close to the behavior we are seeing. The questions are still valid questions. –  Shafik Yaghmour Mar 4 at 23:25
2  
[continued..] When switching to -fno-builtin, it also diagnoses the ill-formedness of f itself. Is the question now: "Is it conforming that gcc shows this different behaviour with different switches?" or is it "Is it conforming that gcc accepts the non-constant-expression as an array bound?" or is it "Is gcc conforming when not to rejecting f?" –  dyp Mar 4 at 23:39

1 Answer 1

GCC does not consider f() to be a constant expression. Look at the diagnostics for the first sample program you linked:

main.cpp: In function 'int main()':
main.cpp:10:19: warning: ISO C++ forbids variable length array 'a' [-Wvla]
         char a[f()];
                   ^

The compiler doesn't think f() is a constant expression, the program is in fact using GCC's extension that allows variable length arrays - arrays with non-constant size.

If you change the program to force f() into a constant expression:

int main() {
    constexpr int size = f();
    char a[size];
    printf("%zd\n", sizeof a);
}

GCC does report an error:

main.cpp: In function 'int main()':
main.cpp:10:32:   in constexpr expansion of 'f()'
main.cpp:5:41: error: 'printf(((const char*)"a side effect!\012"))' is not a constant expression
         return printf("a side effect!\n");
                                         ^
share|improve this answer
    
this is a simpler example with strlen, I have to look at the other example again. –  Shafik Yaghmour Mar 5 at 2:34
    
@ShafikYaghmour strlen has no side effects. It very well could be constexpr. Considering that this compiles, I'd say for all purposes it is constexpr for that particular flavor of gcc+args. Interestingly, C++1y (well, N3936 anyway) 17.6.5.6 [constexpr.functions]/1 probably forbids this behavior: "This standard explicitly requires that certain standard library functions are constexpr (7.1.5). An implementation shall not declare any standard library function signature as constexpr except for those where it is explicitly required." –  Casey Mar 5 at 2:51
    
If you use -fno-builtin it generates an error: error: call to non-constexpr function 'size_t strlen(const char*)' –  Shafik Yaghmour Mar 5 at 3:07
    
@ShafikYaghmour Yes, I'm aware - hence my statement "for that particular flavor of gcc + args". –  Casey Mar 5 at 3:19
    
+1 The original example has too many things going on so I updated my question and added a simpler example using std::pow since we know that it can not be a constexpr. We also know what gcc is doing here is using the builtin to generate a constant at compile time. It is still not clear to me that this is valid. –  Shafik Yaghmour Mar 5 at 4:24

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