Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

I see some codes that have method implementation as

public void setVariables(final int value){
this.value=value;
}

why is the final keyword used in the parameter. why not declare

public void setVariables(int value){
this.value=value;
}

I understand that for classes defined inside methods that access method parameters, they have to declared final

what exactly is the benefit of having final keyword in parameter ?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by trutheality, nawfal, Elliott Frisch Jul 6 at 5:36

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
What does final do when applied to variables? That's your answer. –  Sotirios Delimanolis Mar 4 at 20:45
    
I think the question here really is "why do people mark the argument as final when it clearly isn't needed?" and the answer might be "that's just what their IDE template for setters generated" –  matt b Mar 4 at 20:46
2  
Some people use final because most of the time a method's parameter value should not be changed inside the method, and final enforces that. Other people believe that including final on every method parameter introduces unnecessary clutter. –  GriffeyDog Mar 4 at 20:53
    
I think that it is bad idea to pass a constant. It should be public and visible almost to all related classes. If you want to restrict to change variable - simply restrict setters access that's it. In other hand, I mostly use final then I am using anonymous classes and try to pass a variable inside this class method. :) –  solvator Mar 4 at 21:01
    
@solvator there's no such thing as "passing a constant" in Java; this doesn't do what you think; it's not like const in c++ where it says you aren't going to mutate an object. It simply prevents assigning a new value (primitive or reference value) to the variable inside the method. –  Brian Roach Mar 4 at 21:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Basically, the difference is between

public int doThing( int value )
{
     value = value*2; // OK
     return value;
}

and

public int doThing( final int value )
{
     value = value*2; // Not OK
     return value;
}

This can be helpful to you as a programmer to prevent you from changing the value accidentally.

There is one situation where the final keyword is necessary, and that is if you want to use the value in anonymous nested classes, e.g:

public Object makeThing( final String name )
{
    return new Object()
        {
            @Override
            public String toString(){
                return name; // Won't work if `name` is not `final`.
            }
        };
}

Related:

share|improve this answer
    
+1, moreover if you pass a reference, you make it unmodifiable I believe –  poitevinpm Mar 4 at 20:53
    
@poitevinpm Using final on a reference doesn't prevent using the reference to modify the object to which it points. –  GriffeyDog Mar 4 at 20:56
1  
@poitevinpm If you pass a reference, you make it impossible to reassign it to another object, but if the object is mutable, you can still change it (e.g. if it is a list, you can still add elements to it). –  trutheality Mar 4 at 20:56
    
This is the correct answer but you have void method returning an int in your example (just to pick nits). –  Brian Roach Mar 4 at 20:59
    
@BrianRoach oops. –  trutheality Mar 4 at 21:02

to make sure that you don't override that argument

for example to avoid something like this

public void setVariables(final int value){
  value = 1;
}
share|improve this answer
    
what does that mean? plz give me an example where having the final absolutely essential –  eagertoLearn Mar 4 at 20:46
    
see update <!--- > –  Jigar Joshi Mar 4 at 20:49

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.