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I'm getting the error "Type error: 'locationTile' is not a callable object when trying to call its fdel() method. Code:

class GamePlayLocationTiles(object):
    """The stuff needed for game play"""
    _locationTiles = []

    def locationTiles():
        doc = "property locationTiles's doc string"
        def fget(self):
            return self._locationTiles[0]
        def fset(self, value):
            self._locationTiles = value[0]
        def fdel(self):
            del self._locationTiles[0]
        return locals()  # credit: David Niergarth
    locationTiles = property(**locationTiles())

    def __init__(self):
        self.fill_location_tiles_list()

different module:

import game_play_model

class GamePlayController:
    """perform operations on the game_play_model"""

    def __init__(self):
        self.the_game_location_tiles = game_play_model.GamePlayLocationTiles()
        self.shuffle_location_tiles()


    def shuffle_location_tiles(self):
        self.the_game_location_tiles.locationTiles().fdel() //this line causes the error

def main():
    the_game_play_controller = GamePlayController()

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()

Just trying to delete it as a test on accessing a private variable with a getter, setter, deleter.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted
def shuffle_location_tiles(self):
    del self.the_game_location_tiles.locationTiles

The fdel function should not be called directly. It will be called for you when the instance tries to delete the property.

For example,

class Foo(object):
    def x():
        def fget(self):
            """I'm the 'x' property."""
            return self._x

        def fset(self, value):
            self._x = value

        def fdel(self):
            print('deleting x')
            del self._x
        return locals()
    x = property(**x())

    def __init__(self):
        self._x = None


c = Foo()
del c.x
# deleting x

self.the_game_location_tiles.locationTiles() raises the error

"Type error: 'locationTile' is not a callable

because self.the_game_location_tiles.locationTiles calls fget and returns the value, self._locationTiles[0]. That value happens to not be callable.

You could access the property itself using GamePlayLocationTiles.locationTiles, and call fdel with

GamePlayLocationTiles.locationTiles.fdel(self.the_game_location_tiles)

but there is no reason to do that when you can just use the statement

del self.the_game_location_tiles.locationTiles
share|improve this answer
    
This is the answer thank you. I tried deleting the [0] from the getter, setter, deleter in my code for fdel etc, so it deletes the whole list, not just one member, and it now has an error inside the fdel() method saying _locationTiles is read only. So I could get it but not delete it. Do you know why? –  user3164083 Mar 4 at 21:10
    
It's a list with the setter, getter, deleter. You cannot del a list like that. It works now. I changed it to: 'def fdel(self): del self._locationTiles[0:len(self._locationTiles)]' Thanks :) –  user3164083 Mar 4 at 21:21
    
Ah, it is simply that an instance can not delete a class attribute, (at least not that way.) –  unutbu Mar 4 at 21:23
    
Oh, so a slightly different reason than I thought! Thanks for all the info! –  user3164083 Mar 4 at 21:32

The point of using property is that you're not using the functions directly, but use common Python idioms to get/set/delete.

In this case, you would not be calling self.the_game_location_tiles.locationTiles().fdel(), but instead del self.the_game_location_tiles.locationTiles, which would call your fdel() method.

The same goes for getting and setting:

  • self.the_game_location_tiles.locationTiles will use your fget.
  • self.the_game_location_tiles.locationTiles = y will use your fset.
share|improve this answer
def locationTiles():
    doc = "property locationTiles's doc string"
    def fget(self):
        return self._locationTiles[0]
    def fset(self, value):
        self._locationTiles = value[0]
    def fdel(self):
        del self._locationTiles[0]
    return locals()  # credit: David Niergarth

locationTiles = property(**locationTiles()) # This redefines locationTiles to a variable

I see that you have a function and a variable both given the same name. This could cause problems with the execution. When you try to reference the function locationTiles(), Python sees it as the variable locationTiles

def shuffle_location_tiles(self):
    self.the_game_location_tiles.locationTiles().fdel() //this line causes the error
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I learnt from here code.activestate.com/recipes/205183-a-tidy-property-idiom –  user3164083 Mar 4 at 20:59

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