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What is better adjacency lists or adjacency matrix for graph problems in c++? And what are the advantages and disadvantages of each?

EDIT:can anyone provide a link with a clean code for say Breadth first search in linked lists format ??

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Probably depends on your specific needs. –  GManNickG Feb 7 '10 at 21:02
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The structure you use does not depend on the language but on the problem you're trying to solve. –  avakar Feb 7 '10 at 21:03
    
I meant for general use like djikstra algorithm , i asked this question cause i don't know is linked list implementation worth trying cause it's harder to code than adjacency matrix . –  magiix Feb 7 '10 at 21:07
    
Lists in C++ are as easy as typing std::list (or better yet, std::vector). –  avakar Feb 7 '10 at 21:16
    
can anyone provide a link with a clean code for say Breadth first search in linked lists format ?? –  magiix Feb 7 '10 at 21:24

6 Answers 6

It depends on the problem.

An adjacency matrix uses O(n*n) memory. It has fast lookups to check for presence or absence of a specific edge, but slow to iterate over all edges.

Adjacency lists use memory in proportion to the number edges, which might save a lot of memory if the adjacency matrix is sparse. It is fast to iterate over all edges, but finding the presence or absence specific edge is slightly slower than with the matrix.

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linked lists are harder to code , do you think they the implementation is worth spending some time learning it? –  magiix Feb 7 '10 at 21:05
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@magiix: Yes I think you should understand how to code linked lists if needed, but it's also important to not reinvent the wheel: cplusplus.com/reference/stl/list –  Mark Byers Feb 7 '10 at 21:11
    
can anyone provide a link with a clean code for say Breadth first search in linked lists format ?? –  magiix Feb 7 '10 at 21:25

If you care a lot about memory, you can follow this formula for a simple graph that allows loops:

An adjacency matrix occupies n2/8 byte space (one bit per entry).

An adjacency list occupies 8e space, where e is the number of edges (32bit computer).

If we define the density of the graph as d = e/n2 (number of edges divided by the maximum number of edges), we can find the "breakpoint" where a list takes up more memory than a matrix:

8e > n2/8 when d > 1/64

So with these numbers (still 32-bit specific) the breakpoint lands at 1/64. If the density (e/n2) is bigger than 1/64, then a matrix is preferable if you want to save memory.

You can read about this at wikipedia (article on adjacency matrices) and a lot of other sites.

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+1 for insight, but this has to be corrected by the actual data structure used to store the adjacency lists. You may want to store for each vertex its adjacency list as a map or a vector, in which case the actual numbers in your formulas have to be updated. Also, similar computations can be used to assess break-even points for time complexity of particular algorithms. –  Alexandre C. Apr 22 '11 at 10:27
    
Yeah, this formula is for a specific scenario. If you want a rough answer, go ahead and use this formula, or modify it according to your specifications as needed (for example, most people have a 64 bit computer nowadays :)) –  keyser Apr 22 '11 at 10:45
    
For those interested, the formula for the breaking point (maximum number of average edges in a graph of n nodes) is e = n / s, where s is the pointer size. –  Daniel Jan 23 '12 at 8:13

It depends on what you're looking for.

With adjacency matrices you can answer fast to questions regarding if a specific edge between two vertices belongs to the graph, and you can also have quick insertions and deletions of edges. The downside is that you have to use excessive space, especially for graphs with many vertices, which is very inefficient especially if your graph is sparse.

On the other hand, with adjacency lists it is harder to check whether a given edge is in a graph, because you have to search through the appropriate list to find the edge, but they are more space efficient.

Generally though, adjacency lists are the right data structure for most applications of graphs.

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I think you meant to say "which is very *in*efficient especially if your graph is sparse." –  Richard Marskell - Drackir Jan 23 '12 at 18:58

If you are looking at graph analysis in C++ probably the first place to start would be the boost graph library, which implements a number of algorithms including BFS.

EDIT

This previous question on SO will probably help:

how-to-create-a-c-boost-undirected-graph-and-traverse-it-in-depth-first-search

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Thanks you i ll check this library –  magiix Feb 8 '10 at 9:25
    
+1 for boost graph. This is the way to go (excepted of course if it's for educational purposes) –  Tristram Gräbener Mar 24 '11 at 13:30

Adding on to keyser5053's answer about memory usage.

For a directed graph, an adjacency matrix (using 1 bit per edge) would use n^2 bits.

With an adjacency list, the maximum number of edges before overtaking an adjacency matrix, is e = n^2 / s, or maximum average number of edges per node is a = n / s. Where s denotes the pointer size (in bits).

For a directed graph, where n is 300, and using 64 bit pointers, the maximum average number of edges per node is:

= 300 / 64
= 4

Any more than this, and it will overtake an adjacency matrix in size. If we plug this into keyser5053's formula, d = e / n^2 (where e is all edges), and note that 1/s is the break point:

d < 1/64
d = (4 * 300) / (300 * 300)
= 0.0133 < 0.0156

However, given the size of our problem, 64 bits for a pointer is a bit of overkill. If we just use shorts as pointer offsets (16 bit int indices), we can fit (per node):

= 300 / 16
= 18

d < 1/16
d = ((18 * 300) / (300^2))
= 0.06 < 0.0625

Which is better, but it is still a long shot from what the matrix can do for the same amount of memory. This is of course excluding the costs it would also take to manage the lists. But definitely food for thought when deciding whether to use one or the other.

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Depending on the Adjacency Matrix implementation the 'n' of the graph should be known earlier for an efficient implementation. If the graph is too dynamic and requires expansion of the matrix every now and then that can also be counted as a downside?

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