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I implemented my own concurrent linked list using Java's ReadWriteLock. I wrote the following ConcurrentLinkedList class using the readwritelock. Then I created a reader class: ListReader, and a writer class: ListWriter. Finally I created one writer class and two reader classes for testing.

ConcurrentLinkedList class

public class ConcurrentLinkedList<T> {
    public static class Node<T> {
        T data;
        Node<T> next;

        public Node(T data) {
            this.data = data;
            this.next = null;
        }
    }

    private Node<T> head = null;

    private final ReadWriteLock lock = new ReentrantReadWriteLock();
    private final Lock readLock = lock.readLock();
    private final Lock writeLock = lock.writeLock();

    public void add(T a) {
        writeLock.lock();
        try {
            Node<T> node = new Node<T>(a);
            Node<T> current = head;

            if (current == null) {
                current = node;
                head = current;
            } else {
                while (current.next != null) {
                    current = current.next;
                }
                current.next = node;
            }
        } finally {
            writeLock.unlock();
        }
    }

    public T get(int index) {
        readLock.lock();
        try {
            int i = 0;
            Node<T> current = head;

            while (current != null && i < index) {
                current = current.next;
                i++;
            }
            if (current == null)
                throw new IndexOutOfBoundsException();
            return current.data;
        } finally {
            readLock.unlock();
        }
    }

    int size() {
        readLock.lock();
        try {
            int size = 0;
            Node<T> current = head;
            while (current != null) {
                current = current.next;
                size++;
            }
            return size;
        } finally {
            readLock.unlock();
        }
    }
}

ListWriter class

public class ListWriter extends Thread {

    private ConcurrentLinkedList<Integer> list;
    private int[] arr;

    public ListWriter(ConcurrentLinkedList<Integer> list, int[] arr, String name) {
        this.list = list;
        this.arr = arr;
        setName(name);
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {
        for(int elem : arr) {
            list.add(elem);
            System.out.println("Thread " + getName() + " writing " + elem + " to the list");
            try {
                Thread.sleep(50);
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }
}

ListReader class

public class ListReader extends Thread {
    private ConcurrentLinkedList<Integer> list;

    public ListReader(ConcurrentLinkedList<Integer> list, String name) {
        setName(name);
        this.list = list;
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {
        for(int i=0; i<list.size(); i++) {
            int elem = list.get(i);
            System.out.println("Thread " + getName() + " reading " + elem + " from the list");
            try {
                Thread.sleep(100);
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }
}

MainRun class

public class MainRun {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int[] numbers = new int[] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 };
        ConcurrentLinkedList<Integer> myList = new ConcurrentLinkedList<Integer>();

        Thread thread1 = new ListWriter(myList, numbers, "thread1");
        Thread thread2 = new ListReader(myList, "thread2");
        Thread thread3 = new ListReader(myList, "thread3");

        thread1.start();
        thread2.start();
        thread3.start();
    }
}

However, after running the program, sometimes I got incorrect output like this:

Thread thread1 writing 1 to the list
Thread thread3 reading 1 from the list
Thread thread1 writing 2 to the list
Thread thread3 reading 2 from the list
Thread thread1 writing 3 to the list
Thread thread1 writing 4 to the list
Thread thread3 reading 3 from the list
Thread thread1 writing 5 to the list
Thread thread3 reading 4 from the list
Thread thread3 reading 5 from the list

which means that the Reader thread2 never gets a chance to run. But sometimes it runs fine where both thread2 and thread3 are reading from the list. I even tried changing the Reader thread to sleep for longer time (e.g. Thread.sleep(500) in ListReader), but it still occasionally gets wrong where thread2 never runs. What causes this thread starvation problem for the reader thread? Why sometimes it works but sometimes it doesn't?

share|improve this question
    
@peter.petrov The problem is: Sometimes thread2 never gets a chance to run. The correct output should show two Reader threads: thread2 and thread3 both read from the list concurrently. – tonga Mar 4 '14 at 21:27
    
Why do you sleep at all in the reader thread? – fge Mar 4 '14 at 21:30
    
@fge I just give some time for the Writer thread to run when Reader thread is sleeping. If I remove sleep in Reader thread, it won't get correct output. – tonga Mar 4 '14 at 21:34
    
Did you try to use Thread.yield() to force a thread to allow the other ones to run ? – njzk2 Mar 4 '14 at 21:34
    
@njzk2 I haven't tried yield(). Where should I put in? Thanks. – tonga Mar 4 '14 at 21:37

The problem is in your iteration in the reader:

for (int i = 0; i < list.size(); i++)
    list.get(i);

You do synchronize size() and get(), all right. But consider this scenario:

reader              writer
--------            --------
size: 0
                    write
exit "for" loop
<get() not called>

You start the writer before the reader, sure; but nothing guarantees that the writer will be scheduled before the reader.

You should probably .sleep() a little longer but do so before you check for the list size; also, consider implementing Iterable and use that instead, that will avoid the .size() problem although you may still get "short reads".

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks fge. I moved the sleep() block before the for loop in the ListReader and tested it again. This time it seems that I can always get two reader thread ouput. However, thread2 and thread3 always run after the Writer thread1 finishes. Also, thread2 and thread3 always output in sequence, not interleaved as I expected. So is there any method to make two Reader threads: thread2 and thread3 to be truly running in parallel? – tonga Mar 4 '14 at 21:56
    
The fact that the first thread always runs and terminates before the others is beyond your control; it is up to the OS to schedule that sort of stuff unless you use synchronization primitives in your threads themselves. You should really consider an Iterator: you could avoid to test for .size() at each iteration (remember that you synchronize it!). Make that a weakly consistent iterator as well. – fge Mar 4 '14 at 21:59

You seem to think of a queue rather than a list. Otherwise your loop is broken and can’t be fixed by inserting delays. You are invoking size() and get(int) multiple times without protecting against changes that may occur in-between. Once you add a remove(…)method to your list you will get into real trouble with such an attempt.

If you want a queue like behavior you could change the ListReader’s run method to:

@Override
public void run() {
    try {
       while(list.size()==0) Thread.sleep(100);
    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
       e.printStackTrace();
    }
    for(int i=0; i<list.size(); i++) {
       int elem = list.get(i);
       System.out.println("Thread "+getName()+" reading "+elem+" from the list");
       try {
           while(i==list.size()) Thread.sleep(100);
       } catch (InterruptedException e) {
           e.printStackTrace();
       }
    }
}

But of course it would be recommended to tell the readers the expected maximum number of items to avoid an infinite loop…

share|improve this answer
    
Actually after I made the change by using two sleep() then the program seems to behave correctly. But the second sleep I need to remove the original while (i==list.size()) condition to make it unconditional sleep. I think the first sleep will let the writer thread run if the reader thread finds the list is empty. So this is a temporary fix to the ReadWriteLock starvation problem in the JDK. – tonga Mar 6 '14 at 0:50
    
@tonga: there is no problem in the JDK. As explained, your are using it wrong. The fixes posted here are just for playing with it but your code is far away from production code. Btw. maybe you just want to try a “fair” ReadWriteLock – Holger Mar 6 '14 at 8:49
    
I tried using fair lock but it will still have the same problem if I remove the first sleep block. I think this is still the read thread starvation issue from JDK 5-7 as pointed out by John Vint. The other reader thread should not block if another read thread can access the shared resource when the writer thread releases the write lock. – tonga Mar 6 '14 at 15:52

This has been a common problem with the ReadWriteLock implementation. In Java 5 there was write-thread starvation then in Java 6 an updated version saw read-thread starvation. Spend time and read Kabutz's explnation.

Java 8 has a solution for this! If you can, try installing Java 8 and slightly re-write your test to use a StampedLock. It leverages optimistic reads to prevent read/write starvation.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks John for pointing out this. I didn't know that ReadWriteLock has some holes in JDK5 and JDK6. I'm using JDK 7 on Windows. Does that also have this reader thread starvation problem? If so, I might have to wait for StampledLock in your suggestion. – tonga Mar 5 '14 at 19:39
    
@tonga Yes it would have the same limitations in Java 7 (probably closer to those of Java 6). – John Vint Mar 5 '14 at 20:00
    
You must be kidding. Given the level of understanding shown in the question, using StampedLock will be disastrous. – Holger Mar 6 '14 at 17:24

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