Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have all users' birthdays stored as a UNIXtimestamp and am wanting to send out e-mails each day to users that have a birthday that day.

I need to make a MySQL query that will get all of the rows that contain a birthday on today's date.

It seems like this should be fairly simple, but maybe I am just overcomplicating it.

share|improve this question
    
As a side note: birthdays stored as a unix timestamp: You should think about changing this to using DATETIME. Timestamp can only store dates from 1970-01-01 to something around 2038. Once the first user enters a birthdate prior 1970, you will get errors. Check with the documentation on mysql! –  Dan Soap Feb 7 '10 at 22:20
    
Can you assume all your users are in roughly the same timezone? –  Mike Samuel Jan 25 '12 at 19:03
add comment

10 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

This should work:

   SELECT * 
      FROM USERS
      WHERE 
         DATE_FORMAT(FROM_UNIXTIME(birthDate),'%m-%d') = DATE_FORMAT(NOW(),'%m-%d')
share|improve this answer
3  
This doesn't take into account february 29, when there aren't leap years. The user has to send out emails on 28th february. You have to include 29th feb (if there isn't that day) into 28th feb. –  Pentium10 Feb 7 '10 at 21:31
6  
February 29th birthday kids are already used to celebrate their birthday only once every 4 years. They get the no-birthday-spam privilege. Fair deal, isn't it? –  Saggi Malachi Feb 7 '10 at 21:37
    
Let's take this serious, whould you miss a Wireless Carrier bonus for your birthday 3 years in row? –  Pentium10 Feb 7 '10 at 21:40
    
I can use PHP to alter the mysql query if they have a feb 20 birthday. –  James Simpson Feb 7 '10 at 21:43
    
bad approach, see my answer below –  Pentium10 Feb 7 '10 at 21:46
add comment

Here is an answer that property takes into account leap-years and will always give you the users whose birthday is on the 29th of February at the same time as those on the 1st of March.

SELECT * 
  FROM USERS
  WHERE 
     DATE_FORMAT(FROM_UNIXTIME(birthDate),'%m-%d') = DATE_FORMAT(NOW(),'%m-%d')
     OR (
            (
                DATE_FORMAT(NOW(),'%Y') % 4 <> 0
                OR (
                        DATE_FORMAT(NOW(),'%Y') % 100 = 0
                        AND DATE_FORMAT(NOW(),'%Y') % 400 <> 0
                    )
            )
            AND DATE_FORMAT(NOW(),'%m-%d') = '03-01'
            AND DATE_FORMAT(FROM_UNIXTIME(birthDate),'%m-%d') = '02-29'
        )
share|improve this answer
add comment

I come across with this problem, and I just used this simple code using the NOW();

$myquery = "SELECT username FROM $tblusers WHERE NOW() = bd";

The results are today's birthdays so after that I working in sending emails to my users on their birthday.

I store my users bithdays using just the DATE so I always have yy:mm:dd, so this works like a charm, at least to me, using this approach.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I took Saggi Malachi's answer and extended to include a birthday on 29th February into 28th February date, if in that year there is no such day.

SELECT * 
      FROM USERS
      WHERE 
         DATE_FORMAT(FROM_UNIXTIME(birthDate),'%m-%d') = DATE_FORMAT(NOW(),'%m-%d')
UNION
SELECT * 
      FROM USERS
      WHERE 
         DATE_FORMAT(NOW(),'%Y')%4 != 0 AND DATE_FORMAT(NOW(),'%m-%d')='02-28' and DATE_FORMAT(FROM_UNIXTIME(birthDate),'%m-%d') = '02-29'
share|improve this answer
2  
This doesn't properly check for leap years. A leap year occurs every 4 years unless the year is divisible by 100 and not by 400. `isLeap = (year % 4) == 0 && !((year % 100) == 0 && (year % 400) != 0) –  Andrew Moore Feb 7 '10 at 22:00
2  
technically that is not how you detect a leap year (1900, 2100) are not leap years. –  user262976 Feb 7 '10 at 22:00
1  
Actually, if you need to be serious about this, you have to take into account, that every 100 years, there's no leap year, but every 400 there is ... You wouldn't wanna send the leap-day-birthday kids two mails on Feb 28th and Feb 29th 2100 :-) –  Dan Soap Feb 7 '10 at 22:00
1  
I am very much against adding any database overhead for such cases, this should be handled in your code and only run once a year. Databases are a very expensive resource, respect it. Also, why using UNION and not an OR? –  Saggi Malachi Feb 7 '10 at 22:05
    
"Databases are a very expensive resource"? On the contrary; perform your data manipulation as early as you can to save resources. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jul 12 '11 at 10:38
add comment

The answer below doesn't actually work. It doesn't take into account the fact that a year is 365.24 (leap days now and then) days long, so the actual comparison against the users birthdate is complicated to say the least. I'm leaving it for historical reasons.

The other answers should work but if you want a slight optimization, say if there are many many rows, you are probably better off expressing the query directly in timestamp seconds. You can use the relations (slightly involved because of taking timezone into account):

today_starts = UNIX_TIMESTAMP(NOW()) - TIMESTAMPDIFF(SECOND, DATE(NOW()), NOW())
today_ends = today_starts + 86400

and then select records where the timestamp is between those values.

share|improve this answer
2  
This doesn't take into account february 29, when there aren't leap years. The user has to send out emails on 28th february. You have to include 29th feb (if there isn't that day) into 28th feb. –  Pentium10 Feb 7 '10 at 21:32
1  
@Pentium Actually, the more I think about it, the buggier this is. I'll edit and leave it as a warning against this kind of optimization. :) –  Jakob Borg Feb 7 '10 at 21:52
    
this reminds me of a quote I once heard: "It could be that the purpose of your life is only to serve as a warning to other". Kudos to you for standing to your answer! (btw: despair.com/mis24x30prin.html ) –  Dan Soap Feb 7 '10 at 22:04
add comment

Here's my contribution

SELECT
  DAYOFYEAR(CURRENT_DATE)-(dayofyear(date_format(CURRENT_DATE,'%Y-03-01'))-60)=
  DAYOFYEAR(the_birthday)-(dayofyear(date_format(the_birthday,'%Y-03-01'))-60)
FROM
   the_table

The bits '(dayofyear(date_format(current_date,'%Y-03-01'))-60)' returns 1 on leap years since march 1st will be dayofyear number 61, and 0 on normal years.

From here it's just a matter of substracting that extra day to the "is-it-my-birthday"-calculation.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Couldn't you just select all rows that matched the current day's date? You could also use the FROM_UNIXTIME() function to convert from unix timestamp to Date:

mysql> SELECT FROM_UNIXTIME(1196440219); -> '2007-11-30 10:30:19'

This is documented from http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/date-and-time-functions.html#function_from-unixtime

share|improve this answer
add comment
set @now=now();
select * from user where (month(birthday) = month(@now) and day(birthday) = day(@now)) or
  (month(birthday) = 2 and day(birthday) = 29 and month(@now) = 2 and day(@now) = 28 and
  month(date_add(@now, interval 1 day)) = 3);
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't take into account february 29, when there aren't leap years. The user has to send out emails on 28th february. You have to include 29th feb (if there isn't that day) into 28th feb. –  Pentium10 Feb 7 '10 at 21:31
add comment

Since this gets more and more to be a code-golf question, here's my approach on solving this including taking care of the leap years:

select * 
from user
where (date_format(from_unixtime(birthday),"%m-%d") = date_format(now(),"%m-%d"))
   or (date_format(from_unixtime(birthday),"%m-%d") = '02-29'
       and date_format('%m') = '02' 
       and last_day(now()) = date(now())
      );

Explanation: The first where clause checks if somebody's birthday is today. The second makes sure to only select those whose birthday is on Feb 29th only if the current day equals the last day of February.

Examples:

SELECT last_day('2009-02-01'); -- gives '2009-02-28'
SELECT last_day('2000-02-01'); -- gives '2009-02-29'
SELECT last_day('2100-02-01'); -- gives '2100-02-28'
share|improve this answer
add comment

Check this URL: http://www.tizag.com/mysqlTutorial/mysql-date.php

share|improve this answer
2  
Please provide context for the link you have provided. –  animuson Jan 25 '12 at 19:36
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.