Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I searched for this but unfortunately failed to find matches, I have this local anonymous inner class inside a method like this:-

new Object(){
    public void open(){
        // do some stuff
    }
    public void dis(){
        // do some stuff
    }
};

with 2 methods inside it (open,dis) and I know that if I want to use anyone of them just do

new Object(){
    public void open(){
        // do some stuff
    }
    public void dis(){
        // do some stuff
    }
}.open()

Now my question is What if I want to call the two methods at the same time How can I do this ?

share|improve this question
1  
One way could be to have open return this, and chain the calls. –  njzk2 Mar 4 at 22:37
    
@njzk2 I thought about this. But in this case what type should open return? –  Andrei Nicusan Mar 4 at 22:40
    
This has a strong "code smell". If you need to invoke both methods the only way to do it is returning this and chaining, but that commandeers the return mechanism and perverts any natural return type for non-setter methods. If you need to invoke both methods you need a real class. –  Jim Garrison Mar 4 at 22:43
    
@Scorpion There is a good example in The Java Tutorials docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/javaOO/… –  Brian Vanover Mar 4 at 22:46
1  
Do you mean really "at the same time" or "on the same instance"? –  robermann Mar 4 at 22:54
show 2 more comments

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You may create an interface like this:

interface MyAnonymous {
   MyAnonymous open();
   MyAnonymous dis();  //or even void here
}

new MyAnonymous(){
    public MyAnonymous open(){
        // do some stuff
        return this;
    }
    public MyAnonymous dis(){
        // do some stuff
        return this;
    }
}.open().dis();

EDIT ----

As @Jeff points out, the interface is needed only if the reference is assigned. Indeed, the following solution (evoked by @JamesB) is totally valid:

new MyObject(){
        public MyObject open(){
            // do some stuff
            return this;
        }
        public MyObject dis(){
            // do some stuff
            return this;
        }
    }.open().dis();

but this would not compile:

MyObject myObject = new MyObject(){
            public MyObject open(){
                // do some stuff
                return this;
            }
            public MyObject dis(){
                // do some stuff
                return this;
            }
        };
myObject.open().dis();  //not compiling since anonymous class creates a subclass of the class
share|improve this answer
    
@Jim Thanks for the immediate editing ;) I missed the most important ;) –  Mik378 Mar 4 at 22:41
    
You don't even really need the interface, honestly. And if you have the interface, there's no need to chain the method calls at all or call them right after instantiation of the object, thanks to polymorphism. You don't have to have the methods return itself. –  Jeff Gohlke Mar 4 at 22:45
    
@Jeff I don't strictly need an interface, but the OP does not provide a complete context to confirm that I can bypass it. By the way, disagree concerning your second thing: chaining has nothing to do with concept of polymorphism, it's just a way of having a concise code, useful in some cases: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fluent_interface. –  Mik378 Mar 4 at 22:48
    
I never claimed that chaining had to do with polymorphism. I'm claiming that thanks to polymorphism, there's no reason to have the methods chain. You can simply declare a variable MyAnonymous object = new MyAnonymous() { /* method implementations here */ }; then call object.open(); and object.dis(); separately. –  Jeff Gohlke Mar 4 at 22:50
    
@Jeff yes, but Fluent Interface would allow to transform those two lines of calls in one. Useful for the Builder pattern by Joshua Bloch for example. Explanation here: stackoverflow.com/a/4342728/985949 –  Mik378 Mar 4 at 22:51
show 1 more comment
new MyObject(){
    public MyObject open(){ 
        // do some stuff
        return this;
    }
     public MyObject dis(){ 
        // do some stuff 
        return this;
    }
}.open().dis();
share|improve this answer
    
"MyObject cannot be resolved to a type." This is not the complete answer. –  exception1 Mar 4 at 22:43
    
@exception1 You have to actually have a class called MyObject somewhere. It would've compiled for you if the example just used Object. –  Jeff Gohlke Mar 4 at 22:44
2  
Your answer assumes that MyObject exists and already defines (above) those methods. –  Mik378 Mar 4 at 22:44
    
Fair points, Mik378 gives best answer here. –  JamesB Mar 4 at 22:46
    
@Mik378 You're wrong that the MyObject has to already define those methods. That's the whole point of an anonymous class. You're thinking of overriding, which is a different matter/point. –  Jeff Gohlke Mar 4 at 22:48
show 7 more comments

If you want to call methods from an anonymous class, that means it extends a superclass or implements an interface. So you can simply store in a parent's reference that instance and call on it all the contract's methods:

interface MyAnonymous {
   void open();
   void dis();
}

MyAnonymous anon = new MyAnonymous () {
    public void open(){
        // do some stuff
    }
    public void dis(){
        // do some stuff
    }
};

anon.open();
anon.dis();
share|improve this answer
    
All the comments below explained why the interface is not needed, haha ;) –  Mik378 Mar 4 at 23:16
    
of course, it is not really the point; the point is having a parent's reference –  robermann Mar 4 at 23:17
    
Yes, but the OP never mentions the pure necessity of a parent's reference. –  Mik378 Mar 4 at 23:18
    
true only if your aim is just calling Object's methods –  robermann Mar 4 at 23:20
    
the point of this solution is that open and dis do not have to return anything –  robermann Mar 4 at 23:23
show 5 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.