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Assume you have a List(1,"1") it is typed List[Any], which is of course correct and expected. Now if I map the list like this

scala> List(1, "1") map {
     |   case x: Int => x
     |   case y: String => y.toInt
     | }

the resulting type is List[Int] which is expected as well. My question is if there is an equivalent to map for filter because the following example will result in a List[Any]. Is this possible? I assume this could be solved at compile time and possibly not runtime?

scala> List(1, "1") filter {
     |   case x: Int => true
     |   case _ => false
     | }
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3 Answers 3

up vote 21 down vote accepted

Scala 2.9:

scala> List(1, "1") collect {
     |   case x: Int => x
     | }
res0: List[Int] = List(1)
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For anyone stumbling across this question wondering why the most-voted answer doesn't work for them, be aware that the partialMap method was renamed collect before Scala 2.8's final release. Try this instead:

scala> List(1, "1") collect {
     |   case x: Int => x
     | }
res0: List[Int] = List(1)

(This should really be a comment on Daniel C. Sobral's otherwise-wonderful answer, but as a new user, I'm not allowed to comment yet.)

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With regard to your modified question, if you simply use a guard in the case comprising your partialFunction, you get filtering:

scala> val l1 = List(1, 2, "three", 4, 5, true, 6)
l1: List[Any] = List(1, 2, three, 4, 5, true, 6)

scala> l1.partialMap { case i: Int if i % 2 == 0 => i }
res0: List[Int] = List(2, 4, 6)
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Why is this only possible with a guard? –  Joa Ebert Feb 8 '10 at 21:08
    
Sorry, that was a really stupid comment. But why is filter() not generating a result like partialMap? –  Joa Ebert Feb 9 '10 at 11:11
1  
@Joa filter does not change the type of a collection, because it does not modify its elements. –  Daniel C. Sobral Feb 9 '10 at 15:29
1  
Well, filter just takes a predicate, which gives the compiler nothing to go on for inferring the result type. Whereas with a partial function, it can use the types of the results of all the cases and compute an upper bound on those types as the overall type of the partial function. –  Randall Schulz Feb 9 '10 at 15:32

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