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I have made a application where you type the amount of books you want to enter and using overloaded operator ([]) but every time I give a pointer to store an array, it gives me an errors such as

2 IntelliSense: expression must have integral or unscoped enum type Line:11 Column:24 Library Books

and

Error 1 error C2440: 'initializing' : cannot convert from 'std::string' to 'unsigned int' Line:11 Column:1 Library Books

but anyway here is my code:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

class Books{
private:
    string* storage;
    string book;
public:
    Books(){
        storage = new string[book];
    }
    void savebooks(int iterate){
        for (int i = 0; i < iterate; ++i){
            cout << "Book: ";
            getline(cin, storage[i]);
        }
    }

    const string operator[](const int ref){
        return storage[ref];
    }
    ~Books(){
        delete storage;
    }
};

int main(){
    //local variables 
    int quantity;
    //user display
    cout << "Welcome to Book Storage Viewer" << endl;
    cout << "How many books would you like to insert: ";
    cin >> quantity;
    //instantiante 
    Books bk;
    //other handle
    bk.savebooks(quantity);
    //display books
    cout << "These are the books you've entered" << endl;
    for(int i = 0; i < quantity; ++i){
        cout << bk[i] << endl;
    }
    system("pause");
    return 0;
}

also I am not 100% sure if I have coded this correctly and if there are anymore errors please tell me and thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Could you indicate which line the error occurs on? It's hard for us to tell. –  Brian Mar 5 at 1:51
    
storage = new string[book];? Compile error –  gongzhitaao Mar 5 at 1:52
    
Here @BrianBi I have made it more clear now by displaying the line of error and the column –  user3264250 Mar 5 at 1:54
    
yes @gongzhitaao that is where the error occurs –  user3264250 Mar 5 at 1:54
1  
operator[] normally has an overload for a const reference and non-const reference return. In addition, your destructor uses delete improperly, you don't follow the Rule of Three (let alone Rule of Zero), your first getline call will be "skipped", and you don't check that your input succeeded. –  chris Mar 5 at 1:56

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This statement

    storage = new string[book];

is invalid. The subscript value shall have integral or unscopped enueration type.

It seems your class definition has a typo and instead of

string book;

there should be for example

int book;

I think you meant the following

private:
    string* storage;
    int quantity;
public:
    Books( int quantity) : quantity( quantity ) {
        storage = new string[this->quantity];
    }
    void savebooks(){
        for (int i = 0; i < quantity; ++i){
            cout << "Book: ";
            getline(cin, storage[i]);
        }
    }
//...

And in main there should be

int quantity;
//user display
cout << "Welcome to Book Storage Viewer" << endl;
cout << "How many books would you like to insert: ";
cin >> quantity;
//instantiante 
Books bk();
bk.savebooks();
share|improve this answer
    
So what should I do to solve this? –  user3264250 Mar 5 at 1:56
    
@user3264250 See my updated post. –  Vlad from Moscow Mar 5 at 1:56
    
But wouldn't that mess up mt entire application if I declare book int –  user3264250 Mar 5 at 1:59
    
@user3264250 Data member book is not used in your original code instead of using it incorrectly as a subscript value. –  Vlad from Moscow Mar 5 at 2:02
    
@VladfromMoscow: and then take it a step further by replacing string* storage with vector<string> and get rid of int quantity altogether. –  Remy Lebeau Mar 5 at 2:11

My suggestions:

  1. There is nothing in Books to indicate how many books there are. Perhaps you want to pass the number of books in the constructor of `Books'. Books(int numBooks) { storage = new string[numBooks]; }
  2. If you want to store the number of books in Books, add member. There is no use for the member books. Perhaps you intended to use books to store the number of books. If you decide to do that, change string books; to int books; and make sure you initialize books in the constructor. Books(int numBooks) : books(numBooks) { storage = new string[numBooks]; }
  3. If you decide to store the number of books as a member of Books, there is no need to pass quantity to savebooks(). savebooks() can be implemented as: void savebooks(){ for (int i = 0; i < books; ++i){ cout << "Book: "; getline(cin, storage[i]); } }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, it was very informative –  user3264250 Mar 5 at 3:06

it seems no one metions the segment fault at the end of the program which due to delete storage but it should be delete [] storage

I tried to compile the code, and this one is ok when the books is less then 100.

   #include <iostream>
    #include <string>
    using namespace std;

    class Books{
    private:
        string* storage;
        string book;
    public:
        Books(){
            storage = new string[100];
        }
        void savebooks(int iterate){
            for (int i = 0; i < iterate; ++i){
                cout << "Book: ";
                getline(cin, storage[i]);
            }
        }

        const string& operator[](const int ref){
            return storage[ref];
        }
        ~Books(){
            delete [] storage;
        }
    };

    int main(){
        //local variables 
        int quantity;
        //user display
        cout << "Welcome to Book Storage Viewer" << endl;
        cout << "How many books would you like to insert: ";
        cin >> quantity;
        //instantiante 
        Books bk;
        //other handle
        bk.savebooks(quantity);
        //display books
        cout << "These are the books you've entered" << endl;
        for(int i = 0; i < quantity; ++i){
            cout << bk[i] << endl;
        }
        return 0;
    }
share|improve this answer

What is this? Doesn't the compiler indicate where the error is?

Books(){
        storage = new string[book];
}
share|improve this answer
    
Well it does tell me that the red marking is on book –  user3264250 Mar 5 at 1:55
    
Correct, because you are using the new[] operator to allocate an array of string values, and it expects you to specify a numeric value indicating how many string values to allocate (storage = new string[number of strings]), but you are giving it a string instead of a count, so it fails with the error. –  Remy Lebeau Mar 5 at 2:08

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