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Okay, I have made a function using a recursive funcion and it is as follows.

global totalExposure
totalExposure = 0 

def f(x):
    import math
    return 10 * math.e**(math.log(0.5)/5.27 * x)

def radiationExposure(start, stop, step):

    time = (stop-start)
    newStart = start+step

    if(time!=0):
        radiationExposure(newStart, stop, step) 
        global totalExposure
        radiation = f(start) * step
        totalExposure += radiation
        return totalExposure
    else:
        return totalExposure

Now, when I put in values of whole numbers, the function works fine.

rad = radiationExposure(0, 5, 1)
# rad = 39.1031878433

However, my function gives out the wrong values when I put in values of decimals. So, how do I make my function work with decimals as well?

For example:

rad = radiationExposure(0, 4, 0.25)

Your output: 1217.5725783047335 Correct output: 1148.6783342153556

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What do you expect as the output and what is wrong with the output? –  thefourtheye Mar 5 '14 at 5:23
    
Just a tip, you should put your import at the beginning so that it isn't called each time the function runs... –  A.J. Mar 5 '14 at 5:23
    
@aj8uppal The actual will happen only once import no matter how many times the statement is run. Python will not reimport a already imported module. –  mig-foxbat Mar 5 '14 at 5:27
    
Nope, I get 70.7212242558 –  thefourtheye Mar 5 '14 at 5:31
4  
Using a global variable in a recursive function is kind of missing the point of recursion. –  kindall Mar 5 '14 at 5:35

2 Answers 2

I'd originally answered that it was floordiv's fault, then I thought it was floating point fudging, now I think it's just bad code. Let's look a little deeper, shall we?

First of all, if you ever see global in your code, try VERY HARD to get rid of it. It causes buggy code like this all the time. Let's rewrite it without a global....

import math

def f(x):
    return 10 * math.e**(math.log(0.5)/5.27 * x)

def radiationExposure(start, stop, step):
    totalExposure = 0
    while stop-start > 0:
        totalExposure += f(start)*step # I dont' know this formula, but this
                                       # feels wrong -- maybe double check the
                                       # math here?
        start += step
    return totalExposure

This actually managed to get rid of the recursion too, which will save TONS of memory.

### DEMO ###
>>> radiationExposure(0,5,1)
39.10318784326239
>>> radiationExposure(0,4,0.25)
31.61803641252657

The problem as I see it is that your global is being saved between recursions AND BETWEEN CALLS of the function. When I ran your code the first time, I got:

>>> radiationExposure(0,5,1)
39.10318784326239
>>> radiationExposure(0,5,1)
78.20637568652478

That's clearly wrong. Not to mention, recursive formulas should call themselves, but they tend to do so in a return statement! To write this recursively would be something like:

def radiationExposure(start, stop, step):
    time = stop-start
    new_start = start+step
    radiation = f(start)*step
    if time <= 0: # <= accounts for something like (0, 3, 0.33) where it will never EXACTLY hit zero
        return radiation
        # if we're on the last tick, return one dose of radiation
    else:
        return radiation + radiationExposure(newStart,stop,step)
        # otherwise, return one dose of radiation plus all following doses
share|improve this answer
    
This is the Euler method of integration for a differential equation, here it is just integration of the function f(x), or the (trivial) differential equation y'(x)=f(x). One should compensate for the case that in if time <= 0: time could be substantially below zero, so in this case f(start)*time should be returned instead of f(start)*step. And then the condition could be changed to if time <= step:, so that the last integration step lands exactly at stop without overshooting and going backwards. –  LutzL Mar 5 '14 at 7:33

First the corrected Euler integration method that is guaranteed to integrate really from start to stop and does add an additional integration point at stop-epsilon (of size step, changing the integration interval to end at stop+step) if the floating point errors sum up towards this case.

Recall that Euler integration of a differential equation y'(x)=f(x,y(x)), y(x0)=y0 proceeds by repeatedly computing

y=y+h*f(x,y)
x=x+h

In a pure integration problem there is no y in f, integrating f(x) from a to b thus initializes y=0 and repeatedly applies

y=y+h*f(x)
x=x+h

as long as x is smaller than b. In the last step, when b-h<=x<=b, set h=b-x so that the integration process ends with (floating point) precisely x=b.

import math

def f(x):
    return 10 * math.exp(math.log(0.5)/5.27 * x)

def radiationExposure(start, stop, step):
    totalExposure = 0
    while stop-start > 0:
        if stop-start < step:
            step = stop-start;

        totalExposure += f(start)*step 

        start += step
    return totalExposure

if __name__ == "__main__":
    print radiationExposure(0,5,1);
    print radiationExposure(0,5,0.25);
    print radiationExposure(0,5,0.1);
    print radiationExposure(0,5,0.01);

A better solution would be to use a numerical integration routine of numpy.


Or even better, use that the integral of this function f(x)=C*exp(A*x) is actually known via the anti-derivative F(x)=C/A*exp(C*A), so that the value is R(start,stop)=F(stop)-F(start), so

import math

def radiationExposure2(start, stop, dummy):
    A=math.log(0.5)/5.27;
    C=10
    return C/A*(math.exp(A*stop)-math.exp(A*start))

if __name__ == "__main__":
    print radiationExposure2(0,5,1);
    print radiationExposure2(0,5,1);

The returned values are for the Euler integration

39.1031878433 (step=1)
37.2464645611 (step=0.25)
36.8822478677 (step=0.1)
36.6648587685 (step=0.01)

versus the numerical value of the exact integration

36.6407572458
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