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I have the following code, which modified the state of the collection inside foreach loop, however, it does not throw any exception.

// _topQueue.QueuedJobs is of type List<Job>        
var slaJobs = _topQueue.QueuedJobs
    .Where(job => job.JobInformation.SLA.HasValue)
    .OrderBy(job=>job.ScheduledPriority);
foreach (var job in slaJobs) {
    // Why this does not throw the exception:
    // "collection was modified enumeration operation may not execute."
    job.SetRunning();
    job.JobInformation.StaticPriority = (int)Common.DjsConstant.PriorityPenalty;
    job.ReprioritizedPriority = (int)Common.DjsConstant.PriorityBlocking;
}

On the other hand, this code does throw the exception:

//_topQueue.QueuedJobs is of type List<Job>
foreach (var job in _topQueue.QueuedJobs) {
    job.SetRunning();
    job.JobInformation.StaticPriority = (int)Common.DjsConstant.PriorityPenalty;
    job.ReprioritizedPriority = (int)Common.DjsConstant.PriorityBlocking;
}

Does anybody know why?
And what exact kinds of modification inside a foreach loop will cause the exception?

share|improve this question
    
Is this happening in production code? Does it happen every time the code is called? –  Andrew Mar 5 at 6:46
    
yes, every time the it has a chance to go into the second loop –  Dingxin Xu Mar 5 at 6:48
    
What seems strange to me is that you are not modifying the state of the collection, but the state of the object inside ; which is legal, if I'm not mistaken. –  dureuill Mar 5 at 6:52
    
Do you mean the two property assignment is legal? however, the method calling does modify the state(it will eventually call a Remove). –  Dingxin Xu Mar 5 at 6:58
    
Is there any multi-threading in your application? –  Andrew Mar 5 at 6:59

4 Answers 4

I'm pretty sure it is because you have an OrderBy which enumerates through the whole collection before it can give any result. So the original collection has been read completely, and therefore, altering the original collection does not affect the already prepared result of the OrderBy.

Update

A simple solution to prevent your exception is to add a .ToList() to your linq query. Then the result is a list, and updating the object internally doesn't affect the contents of your list.

// _topQueue.QueuedJobs is of type List<Job>        
var slaJobs = _topQueue.QueuedJobs
    .Where(job => job.JobInformation.SLA.HasValue)
    .OrderBy(job=>job.ScheduledPriority)
    .ToList();
foreach (var job in slaJobs) {
    // etc
}
share|improve this answer
    
Sounds interesting! can you give more details, and at the same time i will do more testing –  Dingxin Xu Mar 5 at 7:21
    
Yes, you are right, after remove this OrderBy, it will throw the same exception just as the second foreach loop. Does that mean OrderBy has some kind of cache of the internal state? then what's its difference between ToList()? There is just too much mystery beneath the simple interface of LINQ... –  Dingxin Xu Mar 5 at 7:50
1  
It is very simple, an OrderBy requires to iterate through the whole list before it can give any result. So instead of going item-by-item per step in your line query, it has to gather all (ordered) items before it can yield any results. Therefore it doesn't need/use the underlying collection anymore once it has those result. So yes, it sort of 'caches' the results. –  Maarten Mar 5 at 7:58
1  
The difference between ToList and OrderBy is that ToList just iterates through the items in an enumerable, and converts it immediately into a list, while OrderBy is lazy and only does its work (ordering an enumerable) once the first item is requested. And it returns an enumerable, not a list. –  Maarten Mar 5 at 7:59
    
Thanks Maarten, I know ToList is much more safe. Is there any side effect of ToList? If the difference of adding ToList is only some performance hit, then should we consider always use ToList together with foreach? –  Dingxin Xu Mar 5 at 10:07

IEnumerable<T> is for enumerating, not modifying. Try avoid modify enumerables.

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Yes, i know this statement, i am just curious the first foreach loop is in production code with no problems. –  Dingxin Xu Mar 5 at 7:05
    
Probably, but why the first one throw no exception? –  Dingxin Xu Mar 5 at 7:08
    
If job methods modify base collection _topQueue.QueuedJobs inside foreach it's ok for List, but not for IEnumerable –  MelnikovI Mar 5 at 7:10

Interesting. The first enumeration loops over a subset whereas the second enumeration loops over all elements.

Now, if an operation on the first subset (i.e. the 'remove' you mentioned) does not affect the subset itself, it simply might not complain as the code behind the queries does not recognize the removal. Of course, this is just a theory. To prove it (or at least to get more information): What is the real effect of the removal. Would it change or affect the subset in any way?

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My suggestion is that something in the methods on a job.SetRunning() is removing it from the collection in _topQueue.QueuedJobs. In your first example by returning the result of the linq statement you get a cloned enumeration that is independent of the original _topQueue.QueuedJobs.

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