Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm writing a stored procedure that needs to have a lot of conditioning in it. With the general knowledge from C#.NET coding that exceptions can hurt performance, I've always avoided using them in PL/SQL as well. My conditioning in this stored proc mostly revolves around whether or not a record exists, which I could do one of two ways:

SELECT COUNT(*) INTO var WHERE condition;
IF var > 0 THEN
   SELECT NEEDED_FIELD INTO otherVar WHERE condition;
....

-or-

SELECT NEEDED_FIELD INTO var WHERE condition;
EXCEPTION
WHEN NO_DATA_FOUND
....

The second case seems a bit more elegant to me, because then I can use NEEDED_FIELD, which I would have had to select in the first statement after the condition in the first case. Less code. But if the stored procedure will run faster using the COUNT(*), then I don't mind typing a little more to make up processing speed.

Any hints? Am I missing another possibility?

EDIT I should have mentioned that this is all already nested in a FOR LOOP. Not sure if this makes a difference with using a cursor, since I don't think I can DECLARE the cursor as a select in the FOR LOOP.

share|improve this question
add comment

12 Answers

up vote 17 down vote accepted

I would not use an explicit cursor to do this. Steve F. no longer advises people to use explicit cursors when an implicit cursor could be used.

The method with count(*) is unsafe. If another session deletes the row that met the condition after the line with the count(*), and before the line with the select ... into, the code will throw an exception that will not get handled.

The second version from the original post does not have this problem, and it is generally preferred.

That said, there is a minor overhead using the exception, and if you are 100% sure the data will not change, you can use the count(*), but I recommend against it.

I ran these benchmarks on Oracle 10.2.0.1 on 32 bit Windows. I am only looking at elapsed time. There are other test harnesses that can give more details (such as latch counts and memory used).

SQL>create table t (NEEDED_FIELD number, COND number);

Table created.

SQL>insert into t (NEEDED_FIELD, cond) values (1, 0);

1 row created.

declare
  otherVar  number;
  cnt number;
begin
  for i in 1 .. 50000 loop
     select count(*) into cnt from t where cond = 1;

     if (cnt = 1) then
       select NEEDED_FIELD INTO otherVar from t where cond = 1;
     else
       otherVar := 0;
     end if;
   end loop;
end;
/

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

Elapsed: 00:00:02.70

declare
  otherVar  number;
begin
  for i in 1 .. 50000 loop
     begin
       select NEEDED_FIELD INTO otherVar from t where cond = 1;
     exception
       when no_data_found then
         otherVar := 0;
     end;
   end loop;
end;
/

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

Elapsed: 00:00:03.06

share|improve this answer
add comment

An alternative to @Steve's code.

DECLARE
  CURSOR foo_cur IS 
    SELECT NEEDED_FIELD WHERE condition ;
BEGIN
  FOR foo_rec IN foo_cur LOOP
     ...
  END LOOP;
EXCEPTION
  WHEN OTHERS THEN
    RAISE;
END ;

The loop is not executed if there is no data. Cursor FOR loops are the way to go - they help avoid a lot of housekeeping. An even more compact solution:

DECLARE
BEGIN
  FOR foo_rec IN (SELECT NEEDED_FIELD WHERE condition) LOOP
     ...
  END LOOP;
EXCEPTION
  WHEN OTHERS THEN
    RAISE;
END ;

Which works if you know the complete select statement at compile time.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Since SELECT INTO assumes that a single row will be returned, you can use a statement of the form:

SELECT MAX(column)
  INTO var
  FROM table
 WHERE conditions;

IF var IS NOT NULL
THEN ...

The SELECT will give you the value if one is available, and a value of NULL instead of a NO_DATA_FOUND exception. The overhead introduced by MAX() will be minimal-to-zero since the result set contains a single row. It also has the advantage of being compact relative to a cursor-based solution, and not being vulnerable to concurrency issues like the two-step solution in the original post.

share|improve this answer
    
The disadvantage with this solution is that it would hide other exception cases that you may not want to hide because it's not supposed to happen, like TOO_MANY_ROWS exception. –  Paulo Manuel Santos Sep 22 '11 at 8:36
add comment

@DCookie

I just want to point out that you can leave off the lines that say

EXCEPTION  
  WHEN OTHERS THEN    
    RAISE;

You'll get the same effect if you leave off the exception block all together, and the line number reported for the exception will be the line where the exception is actually thrown, not the line in the exception block where it was re-raised.

share|improve this answer
    
Of course. I just left it since it might be useful depending on what you're doing inside the FOR loop and what you put in the exception handler. –  DCookie Oct 21 '08 at 16:40
add comment

Yes, you're missing using cursors

DECLARE
  CURSOR foo_cur IS 
    SELECT NEEDED_FIELD WHERE condition ;
BEGIN
  OPEN foo_cur;
  FETCH foo_cur INTO foo_rec;
  IF foo_cur%FOUND THEN
     ...
  END IF;
  CLOSE foo_cur;
EXCEPTION
  WHEN OTHERS THEN
    CLOSE foo_cur;
    RAISE;
END ;

admittedly this is more code, but it doesn't use EXCEPTIONs as flow-control which, having learnt most of my PL/SQL from Steve Feuerstein's PL/SQL Programming book, I believe to be a good thing.

Whether this is faster or not I don't know (I do very little PL/SQL nowadays).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, Steve. See my edit above. Does this make a difference? –  AJ. Oct 21 '08 at 14:05
    
Oh, duh! Of course it would work. OK, need more coffee. Thanks. –  AJ. Oct 21 '08 at 14:07
add comment

If it's important you really need to benchmark both options!

Having said that, I have always used the exception method, the reasoning being it's better to only hit the database once.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Rather than having nested cursor loops a more efficient approach would be to use one cursor loop with an outer join between the tables.

BEGIN
    FOR rec IN (SELECT a.needed_field,b.other_field
                  FROM table1 a
                  LEFT OUTER JOIN table2 b
                    ON a.needed_field = b.condition_field
                 WHERE a.column = ???)
    LOOP
       IF rec.other_field IS NOT NULL THEN
         -- whatever processing needs to be done to other_field
       END IF;
    END LOOP;
END;
share|improve this answer
    
This is definitely the better approach as you avoid a separate SQL statement. Oracle can better optimize the outer join select since it knows what you are doing for each row in table1. –  WW. Oct 26 '08 at 12:11
    
In this example it would be better still to change the outer join to an inner join and remove the IF condition. –  Tony Andrews Jun 22 '11 at 10:33
add comment

Stephen Darlington makes a very good point, and you can see that if you change my benchmark to use a more realistically sized table if I fill the table out to 10000 rows using the following:

begin 
  for i in 2 .. 10000 loop
    insert into t (NEEDED_FIELD, cond) values (i, 10);
  end loop;
end;

Then re-run the benchmarks. (I had to reduce the loop counts to 5000 to get reasonable times).

declare
  otherVar  number;
  cnt number;
begin
  for i in 1 .. 5000 loop
     select count(*) into cnt from t where cond = 0;

     if (cnt = 1) then
       select NEEDED_FIELD INTO otherVar from t where cond = 0;
     else
       otherVar := 0;
     end if;
   end loop;
end;
/

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

Elapsed: 00:00:04.34

declare
  otherVar  number;
begin
  for i in 1 .. 5000 loop
     begin
       select NEEDED_FIELD INTO otherVar from t where cond = 0;
     exception
       when no_data_found then
         otherVar := 0;
     end;
   end loop;
end;
/

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

Elapsed: 00:00:02.10

The method with the exception is now more than twice as fast. So, for almost all cases,the method:

SELECT NEEDED_FIELD INTO var WHERE condition;
EXCEPTION
WHEN NO_DATA_FOUND....

is the way to go. It will give correct results and is generally the fastest.

share|improve this answer
add comment

you dont have to use open when you are using for loops.

declare
cursor cur_name is  select * from emp;
begin
for cur_rec in cur_name Loop
    dbms_output.put_line(cur_rec.ename);
end loop;
End ;

or

declare
cursor cur_name is  select * from emp;
cur_rec emp%rowtype;
begin
Open cur_name;
Loop
Fetch cur_name into  Cur_rec;
   Exit when cur_name%notfound;
    dbms_output.put_line(cur_rec.ename);
end loop;
Close cur_name;
End ;
share|improve this answer
add comment

May be beating a dead horse here, but I bench-marked the cursor for loop, and that performed about as well as the no_data_found method:

declare
  otherVar  number;
begin
  for i in 1 .. 5000 loop
     begin
       for foo_rec in (select NEEDED_FIELD from t where cond = 0) loop
         otherVar := foo_rec.NEEDED_FIELD;
       end loop;
       otherVar := 0;
     end;
   end loop;
end;

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

Elapsed: 00:00:02.18

share|improve this answer
add comment

The count(*) will never raise exception because it always returns actual count or 0 - zero, no matter what. I'd use count.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The first (excellent) answer stated -

The method with count() is unsafe. If another session deletes the row that met the condition after the line with the count(*), and before the line with the select ... into, the code will throw an exception that will not get handled.

Not so. Within a given logical Unit of Work Oracle is totally consistent. Even if someone commits the delete of the row between a count and a select Oracle will, for the active session, obtain the data from the logs. If it cannot, you will get a "snapshot too old" error.

share|improve this answer
    
This is only true if the isolation_level is set to serializable. –  jonearles Dec 18 '13 at 19:09
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.