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In the 1.6 django tutorial, after speaking about testing, it illustrates a Poll should not be viewed with the index.html view when it has no Choice (a foreign key in this model). I've updated the model to make it simple to check this (in hoping that this would help...) in the polls/model.py

def has_choices(self):
    if self.choice_set.count() == 0:
        return False
    else:
        return True

This turned out not to help since a filter can only be applied to whats stored in the database, which a function is not. So then I was looking at potentially making a validation rule so anytime a Poll object was saved, it would update a new boolean object (model.BooleanField) so I had a data column to work with for this query. However, it then occurred to me, that Choice objects would be saved, not Poll objects when I was actually adding a choice.

This all said, I can't think of how to add a filter to my poll/view.py to EXCLUDE showing polls who do NOT have any choices mapped to them. I was thinking an Poll.objects.exclude(.... would work, but then it gets complicated with joining a query against the Choices who do not have any foreign key's mapped to those results.

Am I over complicating this or is there an elegant solution to this? The tutorial made it seem very easy but I'm finding myself going down an exercise far more complicated than the tutorial for 1.6.

Any answer works, but an elegant one always wins out of course! I'm a fan of updating a model and reusing that for the objects.. but again if I need to have the model also update the database (not just a function), then I can do that too of course as long as the new column will have validation upon every save() event (and again, would that be for the Poll or Choice object!?).

The link is specifically https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/1.6/intro/tutorial05/ under 'Ideas for more tests'.

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

This might be overkill, but one fairly nice option would be to use aggregation to annotate the number of choices, and make that available on a custom Manager model which does the filtering. Something like:

from django.db.models import Count
class PollManager(models.Manager):
    def with_counts(self):
        return self.get_queryset().annotate(choice_count=Count('choice')

    def choices_only(self):
        return self.with_counts().exclude(choice_count=0)


class Poll(models.Model):
    ...
    objects = PollManager()

Now you can just use Poll.objects.choices_only() to return only the polls that have choices.

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1  
I believe a better name would be has_choices – Burhan Khalid Mar 5 '14 at 8:51

This all said, I can't think of how to add a filter to my poll/view.py to EXCLUDE showing polls who do NOT have any choices mapped to them. I was thinking an Poll.objects.exclude(.... would work, but then it gets complicated with joining a query against the Choices who do not have any foreign key's mapped to those results.

Daniel's answer is great, and you can use it directly in your view (without modifying your models):

have_choices = Poll.objects.annotate(choice_count=Count('choice')) \
                           .filter(choice_count__gt=0)

Here the filter is a bit more explicit, you are stating that only show me those polls that have at least one choice.

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