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What is the prefered method for creating a byte array from an input stream?

Here is my current solution with .NET 3.5.

Stream s;
byte[] b;

using (BinaryReader br = new BinaryReader(s))
{
    b = br.ReadBytes(s.Length);
}

Is it still a better idea to read and write chunks of the stream?

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27  
Of course, another question is should you create a byte[] from a stream... for large data, it is preferable to treat the stream as, well, a stream! –  Marc Gravell Oct 21 '08 at 13:57
    
As Brian Hinchey mentioned in his answer below, the code above doesn't compile, since ReadBytes expects int whereas Stream.Length is long –  Ohad Schneider Jan 1 at 17:04

8 Answers 8

up vote 407 down vote accepted

It really depends on whether or not you can trust s.Length. For many streams, you just don't know how much data there will be. In such cases, I'd use code like this:

public static byte[] ReadFully(Stream input)
{
    byte[] buffer = new byte[16*1024];
    using (MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream())
    {
        int read;
        while ((read = input.Read(buffer, 0, buffer.Length)) > 0)
        {
            ms.Write(buffer, 0, read);
        }
        return ms.ToArray();
    }
}

EDIT: I should perhaps explain why my answer is longer than the others. Stream.Read doesn't guarantee that it will read everything it's asked for. If you're reading from a network stream, for example, it may read one packet's worth and then return, even if there will be more data soon. BinaryReader.Read will keep going until the end of the stream or your specified size, but you still have to know the size to start with.

The above method will keep reading (and copying into a MemoryStream) until it runs out of data. It then asks the MemoryStream to return a copy of the data in an array. If you know the size to start with - or think you know the size, without being sure - you can construct the MemoryStream to be that size to start with. Likewise you can put a check at the end, and if the length of the stream is the same size as the buffer (returned by MemoryStream.GetBuffer) then you can just return the buffer. So the above code isn't quite optimised, but will at least be correct. It doesn't assume any responsibility for closing the stream - the caller should do that.

See this article for more info (and an alternative implementation).

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4  
@Jon, it may be worth mentioning yoda.arachsys.com/csharp/readbinary.html –  Sam Saffron Feb 12 '09 at 23:11
2  
@Jeff: We don't really have the context here, but if you've been writing to a stream, then yes you need to "rewind" it before reading. There's just one "cursor" saying where you are within the stream - not one for reading and a separate one for writing. –  Jon Skeet Mar 20 '12 at 6:42
2  
@Jeff: It's the responsibility of the caller. After all, the stream may not be seekable (e.g. a network stream) or there may simply be no need to rewind it. –  Jon Skeet Mar 21 '12 at 10:19
5  
Could i ask why 16*1024 specifically? –  just_name Apr 12 '12 at 10:30
3  
@just_name: I don't know if this has any significance, but (16*1024) happens to be half of Int16.MaxValue :) –  caesay Apr 16 '12 at 2:18

While Jon's answer is correct, he is rewriting code that already exists in CopyTo. So for .Net 4 use Sandip's solution, but for previous version of .Net use Jon's answer. Sandip's code would be improved by use of "using" as exceptions in CopyTo are, in many situations, quite likely and would leave the MemoryStream not disposed.

public static byte[] ReadFully(Stream input)
{
    using (MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream())
    {
        input.CopyTo(ms);
        return ms.ToArray();
    }
}
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2  
What different does it make between your answer and Jon's? Also I must do this input.Position=0 for the CopyTo to work. –  Jeff Mar 20 '12 at 0:42
    
@nathan , readig a file from web client (filizesize=1mb) - the iis will have to load the whole 1mb to its memory right ? –  Royi Namir Nov 13 '12 at 8:14
1  
@Jeff, my answer will only work on .Net 4 or above, Jons will work on lower versions by rewriting functionality provided to us in the later version. You're correct that CopyTo will only copy from the current position, if you have a Seekable stream and you want to copy from the beginning then you can move to the beginning using your code or input.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin), though in many cases your stream may not be Seekable. –  Nathan Phillips Feb 26 '13 at 16:20
    
@RoyiNamir, you are correct that the purpose of this code is to read the whole content of the stream into memory. I am not sure exactly what you are asking, but if you are using WebClient and this code at the client end with IIS as the server then IIS would not read the whole file into memory, but the client would. –  Nathan Phillips Feb 26 '13 at 16:24
    
it might be worth checking if input is already a MemorySteam and short circuiting. I know it would be stupid of the caller to pass a MemoryStream but ... –  Jodrell Mar 27 '13 at 12:19

Just want to point out that in case you have a MemoryStream you already have memorystream.ToArray() for that.

Also, if you are dealing with streams of unknown or different subtypes and you can receive a MemoryStream, you can relay on said method for those cases and still use the accepted answer for the others, like this:

    public static byte[] StreamToByteArray(Stream stream)
    {
        if (stream is MemoryStream)
        {
            return ((MemoryStream)stream).ToArray();                
        }
        else
        {
            // Jon Skeet's accepted answer 
            return ReadFully(stream);
        }
    }
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Huh, what are all the upvotes for? Even with the most generous assumptions, this only works for streams that are already MemoryStreams. Of course the example is also obviously incomplete, in how it's using an uninitialized variable. –  romkyns Jul 30 '10 at 23:48
2  
That's right, thanks for pointing that out. The point still stands for MemoryStream though, so I fixed it to reflect that. –  Fernando Neira Oct 6 '10 at 10:21
    
Just mention that for MemoryStream another possibility is MemoryStream.GetBuffer(), although there are some gotchas involved. See stackoverflow.com/questions/1646193/… and krishnabhargav.blogspot.dk/2009/06/… –  RenniePet Jan 2 '13 at 5:29
MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream();
file.PostedFile.InputStream.CopyTo(ms);
var byts = ms.ToArray();
ms.Dispose();
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just my couple cents... the practice that I often use is to organize the methods like this as a custom helper

public static class StreamHelpers
{
    public static byte[] ReadFully(this Stream input)
    {
        using (MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream())
        {
            input.CopyTo(ms);
            return ms.ToArray();
        }
    }
}

add namespace to the config file and use it anywhere you wish

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You can even make it fancier with extensions:

namespace Foo
{
    public static class Extensions
    {
        public static byte[] ToByteArray(this Stream stream)
        {
            using (stream)
            {
                using (MemoryStream memStream = new MemoryStream())
                {
                     stream.CopyTo(memStream);
                     return memStream.ToArray();
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

And then call it as a regular method:

byte[] arr = someStream.ToByteArray()
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10  
I think it's a bad idea to put the input stream in a using block. That responsibility should rest with the calling procedure. –  Jeff Aug 22 '13 at 19:33

I get a compile time error with Bob's (i.e. the questioner's) code. Stream.Length is a long whereas BinaryReader.ReadBytes takes an integer parameter. In my case, I do not expect to be dealing with Streams large enough to require long precision, so I use the following:

Stream s;
byte[] b;

if (s.Length > int.MaxValue) {
  throw new Exception("This stream is larger than the conversion algorithm can currently handle.");
}

using (var br = new BinaryReader(s)) {
  b = br.ReadBytes((int)s.Length);
}
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The one above is ok...but you will encounter data corruption when you send stuff over SMTP (if you need to). I've altered to something else that will help to correctly send byte for byte: '

using System;
using System.IO;

        private static byte[] ReadFully(string input)
        {
            FileStream sourceFile = new FileStream(input, FileMode.Open); //Open streamer
            BinaryReader binReader = new BinaryReader(sourceFile);
            byte[] output = new byte[sourceFile.Length]; //create byte array of size file
            for (long i = 0; i < sourceFile.Length; i++)
                output[i] = binReader.ReadByte(); //read until done
            sourceFile.Close(); //dispose streamer
            binReader.Close(); //dispose reader
            return output;
        }'
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I don't see where this code avoids data corruption. Can you explain it? –  Nippey Oct 11 '12 at 7:38
    
Let's say that you have a picture and you want to send it via SMTP. You'll probably use base64 encoding. For some reason, the file gets corrupted if you break it up as bytes. However, using a binary reader will allow the file to be successfully sent. –  NothinRandom Oct 29 '12 at 23:36
    
Somewhat old, but I felt this bears mentioning - the implementation @NothinRandom provides works with strings, not streams. It would probably be simplest to just use File.ReadAllBytes in this case, though. –  XwipeoutX Apr 11 at 6:35

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