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for some reason strcmp() isn't returning 0 as it should. Here is the code:

#include <iostream>
#include <ccstring>

int main()
{
      char buffer[2];
      buffer[0] = 'o';

      char buffer2[2];
      char buffer2[0] = 'o';

      cout<<strcmp(buffer, buffer2);
}

Thanks!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Terminated the string first before comparing.

    #include <iostream>
    #include <ccstring>

    int main()
    {
          char buffer[2];
          buffer[0] = 'o';
          buffer[1] = 0;  <--

          char buffer2[2];
          buffer2[0] = 'o';
              buffer2[1] = 0;  <--

          cout<<strcmp(buffer, buffer2);
    }

Edit:(March 7, 2014):
Additional string initialization:

    int main()
    {
          //---using string literals.
          char* str1  = "Hello one";   //<--this is already NULL terminated
          char str2[] = "Hello two";  //<--also already NULL terminated.

          //---element wise initializatin
          char str3[] = {'H','e','l','l','o'};  //<--this is not NULL terminated
          char str4[] = {'W','o','r','l','d', 0}; //<--Manual NULL termination

    }
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Awesome answer, thanks so much! So char arrays are never initialized with the null terminator unless specifically defined? –  user3367265 Mar 5 '14 at 9:23
    
@user3367265 If they're static, any unspecified elements will be zero initialized. Otherwise, if you specify any initialization, then the unspecified elements will be zero initialized. (e.g. char b[2] = { 'o' };). But if you specify nothing, they aren't initialized at all. –  James Kanze Mar 5 '14 at 9:26
    
@user3367265: more specifically, variables are default-initialized unless specified otherwise which for user types means calling the default constructors and for built-in types means doing nothing. A worthy exception is global variables (variables at namespace level, class static members and local static variables) which are value-initialized which for user defined types means calling the default constructor and for built-in type means zero-initializing (which as the name implies... puts a 0 there). –  Matthieu M. Mar 5 '14 at 9:28

C strings are zero terminated.

Your strings aren't. This is simply undefined behaviour. Anything can happen.

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Thanks for the quick reply. Aren't char arrays initialized with the null terminator or does that only apply when an array is initialized with a string literal? So it would only work for char buffer[] = "o";? –  user3367265 Mar 5 '14 at 9:19
    
this is type independent. local variables aren't initialized unless explicitly told. yes, that's how you tell it. –  Karoly Horvath Mar 5 '14 at 9:21
    
Thank you! I guess I need to deprogram myself from the Java way of doing things haha. –  user3367265 Mar 5 '14 at 9:22
    
@user3367265 If you want to do it the C++ way, forget about character arrays and strcmp: use std::strings, and compare them with the usual comparison operators. –  fredoverflow Mar 5 '14 at 14:26
1  
Java prefers safety, while C++ prefers optimization opportunities. remember this, and a lot of things will make sense. and if it isn't a bottleneck, go with std::string as @FredOverflow suggested. –  Karoly Horvath Mar 5 '14 at 14:33

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