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Here is the sample script with my problem:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings FATAL => 'all';
use feature 'say';

my $string = "aaabc";

my $re = qr/
    ^           # Start of line
    (.)         # Now \1 has 'a'
    .*?         #
    ([^\1])     # This is incorrect. It does not work as I need
                # Here I need to match the thing that is not \1
                # (in this case I need to match 'b')
/x;

if ($string =~ $re) {

    say $1;
    say $2;

} else {

    say 'no match';

}
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1  
Use a negative look-ahead assertion. (?!\1) will match a string that is not \1. –  TLP Mar 5 '14 at 11:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

you need a Negative Lookahead. This will find the pattern and start the rest of the search from there. Meaning the next capture will be the one you seek.

my $re = qr/
    ^              # Start of line
    (.)            # Now \1 has 'a'
     .*?           #    also (.)+? works as first expression.
    (?!\1)         # Negative Lookahead is non-capturing
    (.)            # $2 is b
/x;
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! This is exaclty what I was looking for. –  bessarabov Mar 5 '14 at 12:16
    
And here is the link to the doc about (?!pattern) perldoc.perl.org/perlre.html#%28?!pattern%29 –  bessarabov Mar 5 '14 at 12:18

As suggested by @DeVadder, you could make use of (?>pattern) which is:

an "independent" subexpression, one which matches the substring that a standalone pattern would match if anchored at the given position, and it matches nothing other than this substring.

my $re = qr/
    ^           # Start of line
    (.)         # Now \1 has 'a'
    (?>\1*)     # Matches \1
    (.)
/x;

This would handle both cases as expected.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. But this is not the solution. For the string 'aaa' it will match 'a' and 'a', but for me the 'no match' is needed. –  bessarabov Mar 5 '14 at 11:03
    
@bessarabov The edit might work for you. –  devnull Mar 5 '14 at 11:23
1  
If you want to stick with the 'not negative lookahead' answer, you could use (?>\1*) instead of just \1* in the original answer. That is a greedy, give nothing back group. So it matches as much a as it can find and refuses to give any back to the remaining part of the regex. So aaa would indeed not match the complete regex. I suppose that would solve the problem and be a lot faster than lookahead, for what it's worth. –  DeVadder Mar 5 '14 at 11:35
    
@DeVadder Thanks for introducing me to perldoc.perl.org/perlre.html#%28?%3Epattern%29 –  devnull Mar 5 '14 at 11:45
1  
@bessarabov Personally i would also argue that knowing and understanding lookahead and lookbehind might prove a lot more useful in other situations. This is just a neat special case where the non-backtracking-ness of (?>) can be employed. –  DeVadder Mar 5 '14 at 12:47

The regex searches captures first character and use it as \1*. Finally get a character that might be same as \1 or different if exists and check if $1 and $2 are same. If they are same then there is no character other than $1. If we have a character then we have a match and $1 ne $2.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings FATAL => 'all';
use feature 'say';

while(<DATA>){
    my $re = qr/^(.)\1*(.)/x;
    if ($_=~$re && $1 ne $2) {
    say $1;
    say $2;

    } else {
    say 'no match';
    }
}

__DATA__
aaaa
aaabc
abc
baacd

Output :

   no match
    a
    b
    a
    b
    b
    a
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