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I was asked a question in an interview and i wasn't able to answer it... Here is the question

  • How will you define an instance[c#]?

My answer was it is an other name of an object... what is the right answer for this question...

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"Right answer", is the one you can explain and justify. –  Amby Feb 8 '10 at 7:48
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9 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Instance is to class as cake is to recipe. Any time you use a constructor to create an object, you are creating an instance.

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+1 love the analogy :-) –  marc_s Feb 8 '10 at 6:55
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I would describe instance as a single copy of an object. There might be one, there might be thousands, but an instance is a specific copy, to which you can have a reference.

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MyObject obj = new MyObject( );

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That's not an explanation, that's a line of code. –  Aaronaught Feb 8 '10 at 4:59
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That is how I "define an instance" –  Muad'Dib Feb 8 '10 at 5:09
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No, that is how you construct an instance. That's not a definition. Interview questions like this are generally intended to test a programmer's ability to communicate effectively. Is this how you would explain it to Doris in Accounts Receivable? –  Aaronaught Feb 8 '10 at 14:14
    
If Doris in Accounts Receivable was interviewing me, I wouldn't want the job. –  Muad'Dib Feb 8 '10 at 14:45
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Class is the blueprint, instance is the completed construction.

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yup, my interpreteation would be to mention that only classes can 'define' instances. or something along those lines, I might mention an example in code, or seek clarification of the question.

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a class is akin to a blueprint while an instance is a concrete implementation of the class/blueprint. An instance is also characterized by its identity, state and behavior.

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An "instance" is an object allocated in memory, usually initialized by the compiler directive 'new, rendered according to the structure of a template which is most often a built-in language-feature (like a native data structure : a Dictionary, List, etc.), or a built-in .NET class (like a WinForm ?), or a user-defined class, or struct in .NET; or, even an Enum.

While an "instance" of a "class," for example, will embody, or contain, all the properties, fields, and methods of the class, the fields and/or properties may, or may not, have values allocated to them when the "instance" is created. The class template will also constrain the accessibility of the properties, fields, and methods inside any instance of the class.

The instance is "the real something" created from some "abstract plan for the something."

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I would have rather taken a real life example...

stating that "car" is a class, so if i tell you i have a car you will have no clue what kind of car it is. But if tell you that i have Ford Fiesta, 1.6 EXI 2009 model of silver color, then you exactly know my car. So, this is what an instance is.

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Instances and objects are same if we consider only classes but different if we consider the whole C#. Instance is more general than object.

Anything which occupy space or memory and build by following some blue print is an instance of that blue print.

An object is denotes the reference to a memory location assigned by following memory requirements of a class;

Example:

They are same

  • An object is an instance of a class.

  • var John = new Person();

We get object John by assigning it new Person(). Here new Person() first reserves total memory required for storing its value type properties & its references and then assign default values to its properties.

So this 'reserved memory with default value' is named 'John' which is an INSTANCE of a class and in OOPs is called OBJECT.

They are different

  • A variable is an instance of its type.

  • int x = 5;

Here everything is same. x is a name of memory location which is exactly 4 byte in capacity to store an integer. What is different is here x is an INSTANCE of an int but not an object.

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May be I'm wrong but my knowledge and these resources points me right. :) en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Object-oriented_programming stackoverflow.com/questions/1682231/… msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/s1ax56ch.aspx en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Object_type_(object-oriented_programming) en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Value_type These resources are from SO, Wiki and Microsoft which itself justify that these are reviewed and followed by millions of developers like me so they should be correct. –  Sandeep Kumar Mar 10 at 19:33
    
@Servy As if you treat value types as object then OOPS would be meaning less and languages like assembly and c should be called Object oriented languages because everything is object even 5. –  Sandeep Kumar Mar 10 at 19:36
    
To your first link, I see nothing there to indicate that value types aren't objects, the same is true of the third and fifth links. The second link is explaining how value types are objects. It refutes your point. The fourth link is using object in the sense of the class, System.Object, not the computer science sense of the word. –  Servy Mar 10 at 19:57
    
The fact that value types are objects, and that languages such as assembly and C use them, does not make them OO languages. The ability to create custom types is necessary for a language to be considered OO. That doesn't meant that ints aren't objects, just that using a language limited to a infinite set of objects isn't OO. Having a finite set is not the same at all as having none. The key point, and Eric mentions it in his answer, is that the storage mechanism for how data is stored has no impact on whether or not it is an object (in the CS sense of the word). –  Servy Mar 10 at 19:59
    
First Link: Object-oriented programming (OOP) is a programming paradigm that represents concepts as "objects" that have data fields (attributes that describe the object) and associated procedures known as methods. Third Link: I think you could not clearly understand this "Variables that are based on value types directly contain values. Assigning one value type variable to another copies the contained value. This differs from the assignment of reference type variables, which copies a reference to the object but not the object itself." >>: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/3ewxz6et.aspx –  Sandeep Kumar Mar 10 at 20:46
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