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I'm trying to learn regular expression. I wrote this regex.

^[a-zA-Z]{1}[a-zA-Z0-9.]*@{1}([a-z]+).[a-z]{2,5}$

in fact, I'm not going to use this as an email validator. just testing.
results of this regex are :

exchange@stack.com          // match
s.@.com                     // not
@overflow.c@com             // not
stack..@o.net               // match
stackov@@.com               // not
@overflow.com@s.stack       // not
1#stack.@s.com              // not

but as you see, stack..@o.net is also known as a valid expression. How can I detect those sequentially repeated .s in string?

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1  
[a-zA-Z0-9.] => ([a-zA-Z0-9]|(?<!\.).) – Wrikken Mar 5 '14 at 13:25
up vote 2 down vote accepted
  • You don't need {1} in your regex.
  • You need to escape dot in regex.

If your regex supports lookahead feature then you can use this regex:

^(?!.*?\.\.)[a-zA-Z][a-zA-Z0-9.]*@([a-z]+)\.[a-z]{2,5}$
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as the website you linked, ?! means something not followed by something, but I can't understand (?!.*?\.\.) in your regex. could you please explain it. thanks. – Pars Mar 5 '14 at 14:50
1  
(?!.*?\.\.) means match the regex is there is no .. anywhere in the input (since it is followed by .*?) – anubhava Mar 5 '14 at 14:55

Well, the simplest form of an e-mail address would be as follows :

^\w+@(\w+\.)+\w+$

Explanation :

  • (Start of the string = ^)
  • Match any character
  • Followed by @
  • Match any character, followed by a dot (as many times a possible)
  • Match any character (= the tld, like .com, .org, etc)
  • (End of the string = $)

Demo :

http://regexr.com?38edd

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