Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to search for all instances and replace all separately, even if identical.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my %dataThing;
my $x=0;
my $data = "1 - 2 - 2 - 4 - 7 - 343 - 3 - 1";
if( my @dataArray = ( $data =~ m/([0-9]+)/gis )){
    foreach( @dataArray ) {
        my $replace = "[thing-" . $x . "]";
        # somehow replace $_ with above
        ...
        # add to an array to store later
        $dataThing{$replace} = $_;
        $x++;
    }
}

so output would be;

[thing-1] - [thing-2] - [thing-3] - [thing-4] - [thing-5] - [thing-6] - [thing-7] - [thing-8] 

not

[thing-1] - [thing-2] - [thing-2] - [thing-3] - [thing-4] - [thing-5] - [thing-6] - [thing-1] 

This would be possible in PHP by looping through the array and using str_replace with the function limit set to 1.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use the "e" modifier to the substitution operator to evaluate arbitrary code on the replacement side. This code can count the number of times it's been called and return that number.

my $data = "1 - 2 - 2 - 4 - 7 - 343 - 3 - 1";

my $x=0;
$data =~ s/([0-9]+)/"[thing-" . ++$x . "]"/ges;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, are you able to explain a little bit more in plain what the "e" modifier does? –  Phil Jackson Feb 8 '10 at 6:46
5  
It means that the code on the right-hand side of the substitution operator is evaluated as a full-fledged Perl expression and the result of the evaluation is used as the replacement text, instead of simply as an interpolated string. –  Andrew Medico Feb 8 '10 at 6:50
1  
Thank you, very helpful. –  Phil Jackson Feb 8 '10 at 6:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.