Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
friend ostream &operator<<(ostream &output, 
                           const Distance &D)
{ 
    output << "F : " << D.feet << " I : " << D.inches;
    return output;            
}
share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

Because you don't want the function that writes a instance to a stream to modify the instance.

And because a const reference, unlike a non-const one (unless you're using MSVC) can accept a temporary object, which is useful.

share|improve this answer

IMHO: passing by reference is more efficient than passing via copy and the const keyword stops you from altering the original instance...

share|improve this answer
    
@black: sorry you were faster –  0815ZED Mar 5 '14 at 14:09
    
You're welcome ;) –  black Mar 5 '14 at 14:13

in c++ why we declare reference parameter as const in overloaded function?

No, in the function that you've posted it's done so for the reasons mentioned in the other answers, but there's no requirement i.e. the standard doesn't mandate that an overloaded function taking a reference parameter should be const.

You're mixing up multiple things here. Overloading is a language feature where multiple functions with identical names can coexist, while const is a qualifier which says the data wouldn't change in a given context through that variable/function. They've no relationship that ties them saying it has to be a const if the overloading function takes a reference paramater. The same goes for reference variables too; they're just an alias (a different name) of another variable which has nothing to do with const or function overloading.

share|improve this answer

a function signature is a contract between the calling code and the function code.

You want that the function will require as less demands as possible. If you write demanding signature like ostream &operator<<(ostream &output, Distance &D)

then you won't be able to call your operator from code that operates on const objects:

void Foo(const Distance& d) {
  cout << d;  // syntax error
}

in other words putting as less requirements as possible on function arguments makes your function more general.

share|improve this answer

It is not obligatory to define a reference parameter as const in overloaded functions. Simply in your example of the operator << the right operand is not changed in the function. This allows to use this operator with const objects.

For example

#include <iostream>

class Distance
{
public:
   //...
   friend ostream &operator<<(ostream &output, 
                              const Distance &D)
   { 
       output << "F : " << D.feet << " I : " << D.inches;
       return output;            
   }
private:
   float feet;
   //...
};

int main()
{
   const Distance d1;

   std::cout << d1 << std:;endl;
}

The compiler would issue an error parsing statement

   std::cout << d1 << std::endl;

if the second parameter in the operator << would be declared as a non-const reference.

Another example

#include <iostream>

struct A
{
   A() {}
   A( A & ) { std::cout << "A( A & )" << std::endl; }
   A( const A & ) { std::cout << "A( const A & )" << std::endl; }
};

int main()
{
   A a1;
   A a2( a1 );
   const A a3;
   A a4( a3 );
}

In this example there are two copy constructors one of which defines the parameter as non-const reference and the other defines the parameter as const reference.

If there would not be the second copy constructor then the compiler would issue an error parsing statement

   A a4( a3 );
share|improve this answer
    
Okkkk... Got it got it got it... :) Thank you :) –  Prady Mar 5 '14 at 14:32
  1. Safety: with const we make sure we won't accidentaly modify the object.
  2. Speed: References are much faster than passing by value. Also const tells the compiler the object won't be modified, therefore some optimizations could be made.
share|improve this answer
    
oh... Thank you. got it and i was having one more question that why we return 'by reference' in overloaded function? –  Prady Mar 5 '14 at 14:17
    
I guess you are confused. Read legends2k's answer. You are not obligated to use const/non-const references. –  black Mar 5 '14 at 14:21
    
I read his comment. and i cleared with const concept. actually ma'am has asked the question which is confusing me... she has asked –  Prady Mar 5 '14 at 14:26
    
Explain insertion(>>) and extraction(<<) operator overloading with an example also explain why we return by reference in overloaded function and why we declare reference parameter as const in overloaded function ? –  Prady Mar 5 '14 at 14:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.