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In this example http://jsfiddle.net/eFhRE/1/ I wan't to make the a tag with id shoshone red with help of :first-child. Must be only the a tag with id shoshone and only with the use of :first-child. The rest of the a tags must remain blue.

Here is the html code:

<ul>
  <li class="mosonkhani">
    <a id="shoshone" href="#">Potsmare</a>
    <ul>
      <li><a href="#">Lorem</a></li>
      <li><a href="#">Ipsum</a></li>
      <li><a href="#">Dolores</a></li>
      <li><a href="#">Quiddam</a></li>
    </ul>
  </li>
</ul>

This is the css code I have tried with:

a { color:#00f; }
.mosonkhani:first-child {
  color:#f00;
}

How to do this?

share|improve this question
    
Try .mosonkhani > a:first-child –  Rahil Wazir Mar 5 '14 at 14:28
1  
Curious, is there a good reason why you can't just use an ID selector? Too specific? –  BoltClock Mar 5 '14 at 14:33
    
Agreed. If the link has an ID there is no reason to get more specific that that. –  Paulie_D Mar 5 '14 at 15:11

8 Answers 8

up vote 3 down vote accepted
.mosonkhani > :first-child {
  color:#f00;
}

You want the first child within .mosonkhani. What you had was an element with class mosonkhani which is also the first child.

http://jsfiddle.net/eFhRE/3/

share|improve this answer
.mosonkhani > a:first-child {...}

.mosnokhani:first-child would give every element (with class="mosonkhani")thats the first child inside an element the red color property.

Well .mosonkhani > a {...} would work in this case too.

share|improve this answer

you dont need first-child.

a { color:#00f; }

.mosonkhani > a {
  color:#f00;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/eFhRE/6/

share|improve this answer

Pseudo class :first-child matches the first element in its prefix.

Your code will match the first ".mosonkhani" element in the document.

If you have to select the first 'a' (link) element in any .mosokhani, use:

.mosonkhani a:first-child
{
    color: #f00;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your description of first-child is incorrect. It matches an element which is the first child within its parent element. The initial code does not match the first .mosonkhani in the document. It matches any mosonkhani element which is the first child in its parent element. –  James Montagne Mar 5 '14 at 18:39
    
Also, your solution matches every a as they are all first children: jsfiddle.net/eFhRE/8 –  James Montagne Mar 5 '14 at 18:42

There is no reason to complicate this width first-child or nth-child

Your anchor tag has an ID...use it

CSS

#shoshone {
    color:red;
}

JSFiddle

share|improve this answer

Use a:nth-child(1)

More info on nth child: http://css-tricks.com/how-nth-child-works/

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2  
No need for :nth-child(1) when :first-child means the same thing. –  BoltClock Mar 5 '14 at 14:29
.mosonkhani>a {
    color:#f00;
}

Yes. I know i am not using the first-child.

share|improve this answer

You are using :first-child wrong.

.mosonkhani > a:first-child {
  color:#f00;
}

That should do what you want.

Your Fiddle, updated: http://jsfiddle.net/jeffijoe/eFhRE/2/

first-child will get you the first instance of whatever your selector targets. I personally feel first-child is a mis-leading name.

share|improve this answer
1  
It's not misleading at all. It does really mean "the first child of its parent". It does not mean "the first instance of whatever your selector targets" as you state - that's actually jQuery's :first. If you replaced a:first-child with ul:first-child, it wouldn't match, because the ul is the second child, despite being the first ul. –  BoltClock Mar 5 '14 at 14:31
    
@BoltClock They do the same according to this Fiddle: jsfiddle.net/jeffijoe/saLdB . When I read ul:first-child, I understand it as "the first child within the ul element", even though I know that's not what it actually does. –  Jeff Mar 5 '14 at 14:34
    
That's because that li is both the first ul li and the first child of the ul. I think the misunderstanding lies not in the :first-child pseudo-class specifically, but pseudo-classes in general. The basic idea is that a pseudo-class acts just like a regular class selector, except that its name describes what it actually does, which means it describes the element you are selecting and not some other element that is related to it. –  BoltClock Mar 5 '14 at 14:41
    
No, I understand perfectly fine :) a:hover makes sense to me, but I personally still think 'a:first-child' sounds as if wanting to select the first child of the targeted a tag. This is still just something personal, and I have stated it as such. I know how they work, else I would not be able to give a working example. If you look at the OP, the asker appears to think the same. –  Jeff Mar 5 '14 at 18:15

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