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I have an array as such:

array([[ 10, -1],
       [ 3,  1],
       [ 5, -1],
       [ 7,  1]])

What I want is to get the index of row with the smallest value in the first column and -1 in the second.

So basically, np.argmin() with a condition for the second column to be equal to -1 (or any other value for that matter).

In my example, I would like to get 2 which is the index of [ 5, -1].

I'm pretty sure there's a simple way, but I can't find it.

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you could prefilter your array like np.argmin([i for i in a if i[1] == -1]) but it still returns one as it works on the array [[ 10, -1], [ 5, -1]] –  njzk2 Mar 5 at 16:09
    
Yeah, I have tried these approaches. What I need is the index of the initial array, unfortunately. –  cgf Mar 5 at 16:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
import numpy as np

a = np.array([
    [10, -1],
    [ 3,  1],
    [ 5, -1],
    [ 7,  1]])

mask = (a[:, 1] == -1)

arg = np.argmin(a[mask][:, 0])
result = np.arange(a.shape[0])[mask][arg]
print result
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np.argwhere(a[:,1] == -1)[np.argmin(a[a[:, 1] == -1, 0])]
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Not sure what the problem is, but if I try np.argwhere(d[:,1] == 1)[np.argmin(d[d[:, 1] == 1])] instead (changed from -1 to 1), I get a wrong result. –  cgf Mar 5 at 16:41
2  
I think you'd need to select the appropriate column, e.g. something like np.argwhere(a[:,1] == -1)[np.argmin(a[a[:, 1] == -1,0])] (untested). –  DSM Mar 5 at 16:55
    
Yeah, i missed column selection in argmin. Thanks. –  Blaz Bratanic Mar 5 at 17:20

This is not efficient but if you have a relatively small array and want a one-line solution:

>>> a = np.array([[ 10, -1],
...               [ 3,  1],
...               [ 5, -1],
...               [ 7,  1]])
>>> [i for i in np.argsort(a[:, 0]) if a[i, 1] == -1][0]
2
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