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I am currently researching the various possible strategies for implementing an efficient BitStream in pure C. I need this to implement various bit-based compression algorithms. However, I cannot find much literature on the topic and there doesn't seem to be a whole lot of good examples I can find.

Here is what I am looking for:

  • Mostly macro-based implementation to avoid function calls
  • Functions to read/write 'n' number of bits to/from the BitStream.
  • Functions to read/write specific number of bits like 5 bits, optimized over the generic one.

I am wondering about the following:

  • Variables which should be maintained in the BitStream. There can be a BYTE pointer, a byte position, a bit index in the current byte, a number of bits left in the current byte, etc.
  • How to reduce the number of variables to maintain. The more variables we have, the more variables we need to update.
  • How to use as little intermediate/temporary variables in the context of a single read/write operation.
  • If operations should be done at a BYTE-level, or at a UINT16-level or UINT32-level. Maybe accumulating bits into a UINT32 and writing the bytes when it's full (or when writing is done, with a flush operation) would be a whole lot faster than doing everything per-byte.
  • How can we avoid looping as much as possible. Ideally, we should avoid at all costs to loop over the number of bits to write into the BitStream.

This may look overkill, but when the rest of the code involved in compression has been extremely optimized, it looks like the BitStream part is just spoiling the whole thing. For instance, it's not rare to see assembly routines using SIMD CPU instructions in image compression code to optimize part of the encoding process, but the last step is to write to a BitStream.

Ideas, references, anyone? Thank you!

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Check the FFmpeg project (ffmpeg.org) for examples. Efficient bitstream parsing and writing is at the core of most of its workload. –  Multimedia Mike Mar 6 at 18:21

2 Answers 2

Hmm. Unfortunately, what I'm going to point you to is not necessarily an efficient implementation, and I hope that somebody posts a better answer (I haven't examined ffmpeg as Multimedia Mike suggested). But I can see enough holes in your understanding for me to think it's worthwhile to post this as an answer.

First off, macros aren't necessary for good performance! This is a highly antiquated approach unless you are coding to very old or immature compilers. An inline function is just as efficient as a macro (with caveats, sometimes making it more efficient). With the judicious use of static functions, the compiler can decide what should be inlined and what shouldn't. While gcc may not be an excellent compiler, it excels as determining when a value is constant, even pointers! This also eliminates the need for constant being put in macros. That is, this:

#define UINT_BIT_SIZE (sizeof(uint) * 8)

is exactly as efficient as

static const size_t UINT_BIT_SIZE = sizeof(uint) * 8;

except that the later has a type. For recent versions of gcc (last 4 years or so), you don't even need const for it to treat it as a compile-time constant, as long as it is marked static (or a local) and the value isn't modified by any code in the compilation unit, it treats it as a compile-time constant.

The advent of CPU cache has radically altered what makes a piece of code fast or (comparatively) slow. If the hot portion of your code does not fit into the upper cache (L1 / L2) then your inlining and/or macros end up slowing you down, especially if you have to hit main memory. Likewise, touching data in multiple places at once results in a lot of cache misses.

Having said that, I wrote "Bit Creek", a minor implementation for a non-performance-critical part of a Linux device driver ("creek" as in "not quite a stream"). The struct bit_creek represents a segment of memory that you treat as a stream of bits and the functions creek_get_bits and creek_put_bits reads or writes to it as a stream returning -EOVERFLOW if you overrun your buffer.

I could probably squeeze out more performance if I stored the skip_bits in the struct and even, as you suggested, don't even write the byte to main memory until I have a full byte, but performance was not at all critical for this.

Good luck!

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For the record, here is the BitStream implementation I ended up with. It is mostly macro-based, and uses a 32-bit accumulator. Bits are stored in the accumulator from the most significant bit to the least significant bit. For instance, to test if the next bit is set, one would do (accumulator & 0x80000000). This makes it very practical to do multiple tests without having to manipulate the BitStream much. For writing, I am accumulating bits in the accumulator, and automatically flush them to the output buffer when it is full. Flushing can also be manually triggered when all bits have been written. Your mileage may vary, but I am quite satisfied with it. I have used it to implement Microsoft Point to Point Compression (MPPC), which uses huffman coding, and performance is great.

struct _wBitStream
{
    BYTE* buffer;
    BYTE* pointer;
    DWORD position;
    DWORD length;
    DWORD capacity;
    UINT32 mask;
    UINT32 offset;
    UINT32 prefetch;
    UINT32 accumulator;
};
typedef struct _wBitStream wBitStream;

#define BitStream_Prefetch(_bs) do { \
    (_bs->prefetch) = 0; \
    if (((UINT32) (_bs->pointer - _bs->buffer)) < (_bs->capacity + 4)) \
        (_bs->prefetch) |= (*(_bs->pointer + 4) << 24); \
    if (((UINT32) (_bs->pointer - _bs->buffer)) < (_bs->capacity + 5)) \
        (_bs->prefetch) |= (*(_bs->pointer + 5) << 16); \
    if (((UINT32) (_bs->pointer - _bs->buffer)) < (_bs->capacity + 6)) \
        (_bs->prefetch) |= (*(_bs->pointer + 6) << 8); \
    if (((UINT32) (_bs->pointer - _bs->buffer)) < (_bs->capacity + 7)) \
        (_bs->prefetch) |= (*(_bs->pointer + 7) << 0); \
} while(0)

#define BitStream_Fetch(_bs) do { \
    (_bs->accumulator) = 0; \
    if (((UINT32) (_bs->pointer - _bs->buffer)) < (_bs->capacity + 0)) \
        (_bs->accumulator) |= (*(_bs->pointer + 0) << 24); \
    if (((UINT32) (_bs->pointer - _bs->buffer)) < (_bs->capacity + 1)) \
        (_bs->accumulator) |= (*(_bs->pointer + 1) << 16); \
    if (((UINT32) (_bs->pointer - _bs->buffer)) < (_bs->capacity + 2)) \
        (_bs->accumulator) |= (*(_bs->pointer + 2) << 8); \
    if (((UINT32) (_bs->pointer - _bs->buffer)) <(_bs->capacity + 3)) \
        (_bs->accumulator) |= (*(_bs->pointer + 3) << 0); \
    BitStream_Prefetch(_bs); \
} while(0)

#define BitStream_Flush(_bs) do { \
    if (((UINT32) (_bs->pointer - _bs->buffer)) < (_bs->capacity + 0)) \
        *(_bs->pointer + 0) = (_bs->accumulator >> 24); \
    if (((UINT32) (_bs->pointer - _bs->buffer)) < (_bs->capacity + 1)) \
        *(_bs->pointer + 1) = (_bs->accumulator >> 16); \
    if (((UINT32) (_bs->pointer - _bs->buffer)) < (_bs->capacity + 2)) \
        *(_bs->pointer + 2) = (_bs->accumulator >> 8); \
    if (((UINT32) (_bs->pointer - _bs->buffer)) < (_bs->capacity + 3)) \
        *(_bs->pointer + 3) = (_bs->accumulator >> 0); \
} while(0)

#define BitStream_Shift(_bs, _nbits) do { \
    _bs->accumulator <<= _nbits; \
    _bs->position += _nbits; \
    _bs->offset += _nbits; \
    if (_bs->offset < 32) { \
        _bs->mask = ((1 << _nbits) - 1); \
        _bs->accumulator |= ((_bs->prefetch >> (32 - _nbits)) & _bs->mask); \
        _bs->prefetch <<= _nbits; \
    } else { \
        _bs->mask = ((1 << _nbits) - 1); \
        _bs->accumulator |= ((_bs->prefetch >> (32 - _nbits)) & _bs->mask); \
        _bs->prefetch <<= _nbits; \
        _bs->offset -= 32; \
        _bs->pointer += 4; \
        BitStream_Prefetch(_bs); \
        if (_bs->offset) { \
            _bs->mask = ((1 << _bs->offset) - 1); \
            _bs->accumulator |= ((_bs->prefetch >> (32 - _bs->offset)) & _bs->mask); \
            _bs->prefetch <<= _bs->offset; \
        } \
    } \
} while(0)

#define BitStream_Write_Bits(_bs, _bits, _nbits) do { \
    _bs->position += _nbits; \
    _bs->offset += _nbits; \
    if (_bs->offset < 32) { \
        _bs->accumulator |= (_bits << (32 - _bs->offset)); \
    } else { \
        _bs->offset -= 32; \
        _bs->mask = ((1 << (_nbits - _bs->offset)) - 1); \
        _bs->accumulator |= ((_bits >> _bs->offset) & _bs->mask); \
        BitStream_Flush(bs); \
        _bs->accumulator = 0; \
        _bs->pointer += 4; \
        if (_bs->offset) { \
            _bs->mask = ((1 << _bs->offset) - 1); \
            _bs->accumulator |= ((_bits & _bs->mask) << (32 - _bs->offset)); \
        } \
    } \
} while(0)

void BitStream_Attach(wBitStream* bs, BYTE* buffer, UINT32 capacity)
{
    bs->position = 0;
    bs->buffer = buffer;
    bs->offset = 0;
    bs->accumulator = 0;
    bs->pointer = bs->buffer;
    bs->capacity = capacity;
    bs->length = bs->capacity * 8;
}

wBitStream* BitStream_New()
{
    wBitStream* bs = NULL;

    bs = (wBitStream*) calloc(1, sizeof(wBitStream));

    return bs;
}

void BitStream_Free(wBitStream* bs)
{
    free(bs);
}
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