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I created one Java program to compare two strings:

String s1 = "Hello";
String s2 = "hello";

if (s1.equals(s2)) {
    System.out.println("hai");
} else {
    System.out.println("welcome");
}

It displays "welcome". I understand it is case sensitive. But My problem is that I want to compare two strings without case sensitivity I.e I expect the output to be "hai".

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3  
If you know it is case sensitive, you could convert both to lowercase or uppercase before comparing. –  fastcodejava Feb 8 '10 at 9:05

10 Answers 10

  • The best would be using s1.equalsIgnoreCase(s2): (see javadoc)
  • You can also convert them both to upper/lower case and use s1.equals(s2)
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21  
Just be aware that the two solutions are not necessarily identical for all locales. String#equalsIgnoreCase is not using locale specific casing rules, while String#toLowerCase and #toUpperCase do. –  jarnbjo Feb 8 '10 at 9:48
    
@jarnbjo Can you give an example where for that difference? –  towi May 21 '13 at 8:54
8  
Locale specific case rules are at least implemented for Turkish and German. Turkish treat I with and without dot as two different letters, creating the lower/upper case pairs iİ and ıI while other languages treat iI as a pair and do not use the letters ı and İ. In German, the lower case ß is capitalized as "SS". –  jarnbjo May 21 '13 at 12:24

You have to use the compareToIgnoreCase method of the String object.

int compareValue = str1.compareToIgnoreCase(str2);

if (compareValue == 0) it means str1 equals str2.

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Note that you may want to do null checks on them as well prior to doing your .equals or .equalsIgnoreCase.

A null String object can not call an equals method.

ie:

public boolean areStringsSame(String str1, String str2)
{
    if (str1 == null && str2 == null)
        return true;
    if (str1 == null || str2 == null)
        return false;

    return str1.equalsIgnoreCase(str2);
}
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1  
Note: second two statements can be combined to produce same result like this: if (str1 == null || str2 == null) return false;. –  LuckyMe Jul 9 '13 at 9:10
    
Modified code to be cleaner as per above comment - was long day :) –  VeenarM Jul 13 '13 at 23:45
    
You could also change the first line to if (str1 == str2) return true; which both caters for nulls and also shortcuts the case where the two string references refer to the same string object. –  Barney Mar 27 '14 at 22:11
import java.lang.String; //contains equalsIgnoreCase()
/*
*
*/
String s1 = "Hello";
String s2 = "hello";

if (s1.equalsIgnoreCase(s2)) {
System.out.println("hai");
} else {
System.out.println("welcome");
}

Now it will output : hai

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You can use equalsIgnoreCase

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More about string can be found in String Class and String Tutorials

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In the default Java API you have:

String.CASE_INSENSITIVE_ORDER

So you do not need to rewrite a comparator if you were to use strings with Sorted data structures.

String s = "some text here";
s.equalsIgnoreCase("Some text here");

Is what you want for pure equality checks in your own code.

Just to further informations about anything pertaining to equality of Strings in Java. The hashCode() function of the java.lang.String class "is case sensitive":

public int hashCode() {
    int h = hash;
    if (h == 0 && value.length > 0) {
        char val[] = value;

        for (int i = 0; i < value.length; i++) {
            h = 31 * h + val[i];
        }
        hash = h;
    }
    return h;
}

So if you want to use an Hashtable/HashMap with Strings as keys, and have keys like "SomeKey", "SOMEKEY" and "somekey" be seen as equal, then you will have to wrap your string in another class (you cannot extend String since it is a final class). For example :

private static class HashWrap {
    private final String value;
    private final int hash;

    public String get() {
        return value;
    }

    private HashWrap(String value) {
        this.value = value;
        String lc = value.toLowerCase();
        this.hash = lc.hashCode();
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object o) {
        if (this == o) return true;
        if (o instanceof HashWrap) {
            HashWrap that = (HashWrap) o;
            return value.equalsIgnoreCase(that.value);
        } else {
            return false;
        }
    }

    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        return this.hash;
    }
}

and then use it as such:

HashMap<HashWrap, Object> map = new HashMap<HashWrap, Object>();
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public boolean newEquals(String str1, String str2)
{
    int len = str1.length();
int len1 = str2.length();
if(len==len1)
{
    for(int i=0,j=0;i<str1.length();i++,j++)
    {
        if(str1.charAt(i)!=str2.charAt(j))
        return false;
    }`enter code here`
}
return true;
}
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1  
Unclear and confusing answer –  Shantanu Jun 6 '14 at 11:04

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