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Code will explain more:

$var = 0;

if (!empty($var)){
echo "Its not empty";
} else {
echo "Its empty";
}

The result returns "Its empty". I thought empty() will check if I already set the variable and have value inside. Why it returns "Its empty"??

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10  
@stereo empty is perhaps the most useful yet widely misunderstood PHP function. Learn how and when to use it. –  deceze Feb 8 '10 at 9:31
1  
@stereo empty is essentially short for isset($var) && $var != false. You must be holding your empty very weird to shoot yourself in the foot with this. ;P –  deceze Feb 8 '10 at 10:50
    
@stereo 1) Where is it "inconsistent"? It works like it says on the tin. 2) Loosely comparing a variable to false without triggering an "undefined variable" error is useless? Oh well, guess you never do this… 3) Choosing the wrong function in a security context doesn't mean the function itself is bad, useless or inconsistent; it just means somebody chose the wrong function for the job. –  deceze Feb 8 '10 at 11:27
    
5  
@deceze - If a function is so widely misunderstood like empty(), then it has probably the wrong name. –  martinstoeckli May 29 '13 at 7:55

10 Answers 10

up vote 36 down vote accepted

http://php.net/empty

The following things are considered to be empty:

  • "" (an empty string)
  • 0 (0 as an integer)
  • "0" (0 as a string)
  • NULL
  • FALSE
  • array() (an empty array)
  • var $var; (a variable declared, but without a value in a class)

Note that this is exactly the same list as for a coercion to Boolean false. empty is simply !isset($var) || !$var. Try isset instead.

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So, i must check like this: if(isset($var) && $var != 0){ Do Something} ?? –  mysqllearner Feb 8 '10 at 9:22
2  
Tried isset(), same result –  mysqllearner Feb 8 '10 at 9:22
    
@mysql For this case you might as well use !empty($var), but note that that's not the same as what you wrote in the question. What to use depends entirely on what values you want to regard as true. Just compare the differences between isset and empty and choose the right combination for the right situation. –  deceze Feb 8 '10 at 9:25
3  
@mysqllearner: isset returns True if $var=0. But what you mean with if(isset($var) && $var != 0) is the same as empty –  Felix Kling Feb 8 '10 at 9:26
    
@mysqllearner isset detects if it is NOT empty. to check if it is empty, use !isset instead. –  user1935281 Jan 13 '13 at 6:11

I was wondering why nobody suggested the extremely handy Type comparison table. It answers every question about the common functions and compare operators.

A snippet:

Expression      | empty()
----------------+--------
$x = "";        | true    
$x = null       | true    
var $x;         | true    
$x is undefined | true    
$x = array();   | true    
$x = false;     | true    
$x = true;      | false   
$x = 1;         | false   
$x = 42;        | false   
$x = 0;         | true    
$x = -1;        | false   
$x = "1";       | false   
$x = "0";       | true    
$x = "-1";      | false   
$x = "php";     | false   
$x = "true";    | false   
$x = "false";   | false   

Along other cheatsheets, I always keep a hardcopy of this table on my desk in case I'm not sure

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From manual: Returns FALSE if var has a non-empty and non-zero value.

The following things are considered to be empty:

  • "" (an empty string)
  • 0 (0 as an integer)
  • "0" (0 as a string) NULL
  • FALSE array() (an empty array) var
  • $var; (a variable declared, but without a value in a class)

More: http://php.net/manual/en/function.empty.php

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From a linguistic point of view empty has a meaning of without value. Like the others said you'll have to use isset() in order to check if a variable has been defined, which is what you do.

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In case of numeric values you should use is_numeric function:

$var = 0;

if (is_numeric($var))
{
  echo "Its not empty";
} 
else 
{
    echo "Its empty";
}
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The following things are considered to be empty:

  • "" (an empty string)
  • 0 (0 as an integer)
  • "0" (0 as a string)
  • NULL
  • FALSE
  • array() (an empty array)
  • var $var; (a variable declared, but without a value in a class)

From PHP Manual

In your case $var is 0, so empty($var) will return true, you are negating the result before testing it, so the else block will run giving "Its empty" as output.

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empty() returns true for everything that evaluates to FALSE, it is actually a 'not' (!) in disguise. I think you meant isset()

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Actually isset just check if the variable sets or not.In this case if you want to check if your variable is really zero or empty you can use this example:

$myVar = '';
if (empty($myVar))
{
  echo "Its empty";
}
echo "<br/>";

if ($myVar===0)
{
  echo "also zero!";
}

just for notice $myVar==0 act like empty function.

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if (empty($var) && $pieces[$var] != '0') {
//do something
}

In my case this code worked.

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This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post - you can always comment on your own posts, and once you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post. –  topher Jun 26 at 9:05

Use strlen() instead. I ran onto the same issue using 1/0 as possible values for some variables. I am using if (strlen($_POST['myValue']) == 0) to test if there is a character or not in my variable.

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