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I was wondering if there is anyway that my superclass can call the function initValues() for the subclass without having to override the constructor?

Here's the code:

#ifndef VECTOR_MATH_H
#define VECTOR_MATH_H

#include "GL\glew.h"

#include <iostream>

namespace Math3d
{

class Vector
{
public:
    Vector(int length=2) : v(new float[length]) { initValues(); }
    ~Vector() { delete[] v; }
protected:
    virtual void initValues()
    {
        std::cout << "Vector" << std::endl;
    }
    float* v;
};

class Vector3 : public Vector
{
public:
protected:
    void initValues()
    {
        std::cout << "Vector3" << std::endl;
    }
};

}

#endif

I then create a variable like this: Vector3 vec;

And then I would like the initValues() method of the subclass, Vector3 to be called.

Is this possible?

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Seems like a duplicate of: stackoverflow.com/questions/7644154/… –  Steven Behnke Mar 5 at 18:50
    
@StevenBehnke Looks like the OP's asking for the other way round. –  πάντα ῥεῖ Mar 5 at 18:53
    
It could be, but the other way around doesn't make any sense to me. How would Vector know there is a derived class? –  Steven Behnke Mar 5 at 18:54
    
Calling a virtual method from a constructor is not likely to work as you expect. In a constructor of a base class, virtual functions are not treated polymorphically. –  YoungJohn Mar 5 at 19:11
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Brief answer: No, you can't.

Long answer: The virtual table of the object is not fleshed out until the derived class constructor has been called. In the base class constructor, the virtual table points to the base class implementation of the function. If the base class has an implementation, that function will be called. If the base class does not have an implementation, a platform dependent error/exception will occur.

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At least it is possible, have a look at my answer. –  πάντα ῥεῖ Mar 5 at 22:21
    
It is possible with regular functions in class templates, as you have shown and is well known as the curiously recurring template pattern. It is not possible using virtual functions. –  R Sahu Mar 5 at 22:25
    
In fact for CRTP, it doesn't matter if the functions are declared virtual or not at all. –  πάντα ῥεῖ Mar 5 at 22:38
    
True that. I meant it is not possible to use virtual functions of the base class regardless of whether CRTP is used or not. –  R Sahu Mar 5 at 22:59
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If you want to call both the superclass initValues() and then the subclass initValues() you will need to explicitly call Vector::initValues() from Vector3::initValues() since dynamic dispatch will call always the more specialized version of the method:

void Vector3::initValues() {
  Vector::initValues();
  other specific code;
}

If you really want to keep things in the order you want then you will require a second method:

class Vector {
  protected:
    void initValues() {
      // common init
      specificInitValues();
    }

    virtual void specificInitValues() = 0;
};

class Vector3 : public Vector {
  protected:
   virtual void specificInitValues() override {
     // specific init
   }
};
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1  
I had answered the same thing. But OP is calling initValues() from the base class constructor, so I feel they might really be asking something different. –  juanchopanza Mar 5 at 18:53
    
You can't safely call a method of a derived class from the base class, as the object might be just of the base class, or belong to a wildly different derived class. Rethink your design, this should never be needed. –  vonbrand Mar 5 at 18:55
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You can't do this with dynamic polymorphism (using a virtual function table, aka. as vtable) from the constructor, because at the point the superclass tries to call the virtual method, only the supeclass is constructed yet, and the subclass initValues() implementation can't be called from the fully constructed vtable.

There are two ways to overcome this issue:

1. Make your initValues() method public, and require it to be called from clients after construction

2. You could do to achieve this behavior, is to use static polymorphism instead:

template<class Derived>
class VectorSuper
{
public:
    VectorSuper(int length=2) 
    : v(new float[length]) 
    { 
        static_cast<Derived*>(this)->initValues(); 
    }
    ~VectorSuper() { delete[] v; }
protected:
    void initValues() // Note, no virtual
    {
        std::cout << "VectorSuper" << std::endl;
    }
    float* v;
};

class VectorSub
: public VectorSuper<VectorSub>
{
protected:
    void initValues() // Note, no virtual
    {
        VectorSuper<VectorSub>::initValues();
        std::cout << "VectorSub" << std::endl;
    }
}

The latter way, might inquire some further distinction of an abstract interface implemented in the superclass, to be reasonably usable in a context that doesn't know about VectorSub, and doesn't need to.

class AbstractVector
{
public:
    virtual ~AbstractVector() = 0;
    // example interface
    virtual float operator[](int index) const = 0;
};

template<class Derived>
class VectorSuper
: public AbstractVector
{
public:
    VectorSuper(int length_=2) 
    : length(length_), v(new float[length]) 
    { 
        static_cast<Derived*>(this)->initValues(); 
    }
    ~VectorSuper() { delete[] v; }

    virtual float operator[](int index) const
    {
        if(index >= length || index < 0)
        {
            throw std::invalid_argument("index");
        }
        return v[index];
    }
protected:
    // ... as before

    int length; // Remember length additionally!
    float* v;
};
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