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I have a loop that takes out each word in a string using token, then I want to be able to do computations on it like this:

(1 2 add 3 4 add)

But any way you code it i keep getting

    7
    add
    2  
    1

I want it to be

   7
   3

This is what I am working with

{ %loop
    pstack
    (repl> )print flush
    (%lineedit)(r)file
    dup bytesavailable string readstring pop

    {
        token
        {}{exit}ifelse
        exch
        dup () eq {pop exec exit}if
        exec

    }loop

}loop
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Easiest way: cvx exec will execute the contents of a string as PS code. –  luser droog Mar 7 at 3:04

2 Answers 2

I would advise you to write stack comments at the end of each line. It really helps.

{ %loop
    pstack
    (repl> )print flush
    (%lineedit)(r)file                       % f
    dup bytesavailable string readstring pop % s

    {
        token                            % s t b
        {}{exit}ifelse                   % s t
        exch                             % t s
        dup () eq {pop exec exit}if      % t s
        exec                             % t

    }loop

}loop

So you're executing the remaining substring instead of the token. You need another exch in there before the exec in the inner loop. That would execute the token instead of the substring. But a problem with this is that the string is sitting there on the stack. So add won't work because it will find a string on top of the stack instead of the numbers below.

So it may be better to save the substring by name before exec-ing, and then put it back before the next iteration.

    {  % s
        token                       % s t b
        {}{exit}ifelse              % s t
        exch                        % t s
        dup () eq {pop exec exit}if % t s
        /rem exch def   % t
        exec
        rem             % s
    }loop

This portion may be more confusing than helpful to those very new to postscript. Read on at your own peril.

The next question a postscript hacker should ask is: "How can I do this without polluting the name space with this rem name?"

The insane trick I would use for this is to exploit the loop operator to make a procedure body with extra storage.

{ procedure body } exec
{ procedure body exit extra storage } loop

Both constructs above will execute procedure body and then return control. But using loop with an explicit exit lets us pack extra things into the array.

So, we take the inner loop from above.

token{}{exit}ifelse exch dup()eq{pop exec exit}if/rem exch def exec rem

Wrap it in an "exit-loop".

{
    token{}{exit}ifelse exch dup()eq{pop exec exit}if/rem exch def exec rem
exit } loop

And we're going to store the string remainder just after exit.

{ 
    token{}{exit}ifelse exch dup()eq{pop exec exit}if/rem exch def exec rem
exit STR } loop

Replace the /name exch def with code that stores into an array. This array will be a subarray of the loop body which just holds the [ STR ] extra storage.

/rem exch def  -->  ARR exch 0 exch put
rem            -->  ARR 0 get

{
    token{}{exit}ifelse exch dup()eq{pop exec exit}if ARR exch 0 exch put exec ARR 0 get
exit STR } loop

This loop is of course a straight-shot: it doesn't actually loop. So to replace the inner loop from above, we wrap it in another loop.

{ {
    token{}{exit}ifelse exch dup()eq{pop exec exit}if ARR exch 0 exch put exec ARR 0 get
exit STR } loop } loop

Then we need to insert the subarray where ARR is in the code. This is the subarray of the (inner) inner loop that contains the (dummy) STR token.

%   0    1 2     3      4    5  6 7 8              9  10  11  12 13   14  15   16 17 18  19    20
{ { token{}{exit}ifelse exch dup()eq{pop exec exit}if ARR exch 0 exch put exec ARR 0 get exit STR } loop } loop

So we need a subarray [20, 1] to be inserted at array[10] and array[16]. And we can do this before calling loop at the outer scope.

{ {
    token{}{exit}ifelse exch dup()eq{pop exec exit}if ARR exch 0 exch put exec ARR 0 get
exit STR } loop }
dup 0 get % loop-body inner-loop                     get a copy of the exit-loop
dup 20 1 getinterval  % loop-body inner-loop [STR]   take a subarray of the exit-loop
2 copy 10 exch put % loop-body inner-loop [STR]      insert in position 10
16 exch put % loop-body'                             insert in position 16
loop                                             %   call the loop operator

There, a loop with no name. :)

Notice, we still have the dummy name STR in the code, and that's ok. It will parse as a name and allocate an extra slot in the array. And it doesn't need to be defined anywhere because it never gets executed.


An improvement over the above. We really do not need the second ARR in the template code. We can store the string directly into the procedure array at the position where it is needed. Then we don't even need the "exit-loop". So the template becomes:

% 0    1 2     3      4    5  6 7 8              9  10  11  12 13   14  15   16 
{ token{}{exit}ifelse exch dup()eq{pop exec exit}if ARR exch 0 exch put exec STR } loop

And the fully articulated loop

{ token{}{exit}ifelse exch dup()eq{pop exec exit}if ARR exch 0 exch put exec STR }
dup dup 10 exch  % loop loop 10 loop         prepare stack
16 1 getinterval % loop loop 10 [STR]        take a subarray
put              % loop                      insert in position 10
loop                                       % call loop operator

An improvement of the improvement. We don't actually need a subarray either. We can store the entire loop array in the ARR position and use the index 16 instead of 0 in the storing code.

{ token not{exit}if exch dup()eq{pop exec exit}if ARR exch 16 exch put exec STR }
dup 10 1 index  % loop loop 10 loop          prepare stack
put             % loop                       insert in position 10
loop                                       % call loop operator
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There's some similar trickery in these programs: groups.google.com/d/topic/comp.lang.postscript/kOyCY23ErDo/… –  luser droog Mar 10 at 23:43
    
The above linked thread of programs was in response to a challenge from a Forth programmer that Postscript doesn't allow you to store data on the "return stack". By packing data into procedures, we effectively are putting data on the return stack, since the procedure bodies (and data) will occupy postscript's equivalent, the execution stack. ...That's the backstory. –  luser droog Apr 19 at 8:00

Token simply returns the 'tokenised' object on the stack, it doesn't do anything further with it. If you want to perform the operation you will have to check the type of the returned object and 'exec' the executable ones.

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