Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I get this problem in a c++ problem compiling in Ubuntu g++ version 4.4.3. I dont know the headers to include to solve this problem.. Thanks

centro_medico.cpp: In constructor ‘Centro_medico::Centro_medico(char*, char*, int, int, float)’:
centro_medico.cpp:5: error: ‘strcpy’ was not declared in this scope
centro_medico.cpp:13: warning: deprecated conversion from string constant to ‘char*’
centro_medico.cpp:13: warning: deprecated conversion from string constant to ‘char*’
centro_medico.cpp: In member function ‘Centro_medico& Centro_medico::operator=(const Centro_medico&)’:
centro_medico.cpp:26: error: ‘strcpy’ was not declared in this scope
centro_medico.cpp:39: warning: deprecated conversion from string constant to ‘char*’
centro_medico.cpp:39: warning: deprecated conversion from string constant to ‘char*’
centro_medico.cpp: In member function ‘bool Centro_medico::quitar_medico(int)’:
centro_medico.cpp:92: warning: deprecated conversion from string constant to ‘char*’
centro_medico.cpp:92: warning: deprecated conversion from string constant to ‘char*’
centro_medico.cpp: In member function ‘void Centro_medico::mostrar_especialidades(std::ostream&) const’:
centro_medico.cpp:123: error: ‘strcmpi’ was not declared in this scope
centro_medico.cpp: In member function ‘void Centro_medico::mostrar_horarios_consulta(char*) const’:
centro_medico.cpp:162: error: ‘strcmpi’ was not declared in this scope
centro_medico.cpp: In member function ‘void Centro_medico::crea_medicos()’:
centro_medico.cpp:321: warning: deprecated conversion from string constant to ‘char*’
centro_medico.cpp:321: warning: deprecated conversion from string constant to ‘char*’

medico.cpp

#include "medico.h"
#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>
#include <stdlib>  
#include<cstring>
#include<string>

long Medico::total_consultas=0; 
Medico::Medico(char *nom,char * espe,int colegiado,int trabajo)
{
int i;
strcpy(nombre,nom);
strcpy(especialidad,espe);
num_colegiado=colegiado;
num_horas_diarias=trabajo;
citas_medico= new Cita*[5]; // 5 Días de las semana, de Lunes a Viernes.
for (i=0;i<5;i++)
citas_medico[i]=new Cita[num_horas_diarias];
}



Medico::Medico(const Medico &m){
  int i;
  citas_medico=new Cita*[5];
  for (i=0;i<5;i++)
   citas_medico[i]=NULL;
 (*this) = m;
}

Medico &Medico::operator=(const Medico &m){
 int i,j;
 if (this != &m) { // Para evitar la asignación de un objeto a sí mismo
     strcpy(nombre,m.nombre);
     strcpy(especialidad,m.especialidad);     
     num_colegiado=m.num_colegiado;
     num_horas_diarias=m.num_horas_diarias;
     for (i=0;i<5;i++){
      delete citas_medico[i]; 
      citas_medico[i]=new Cita[num_horas_diarias];
      for(j=0;j<num_horas_diarias;j++){
       citas_medico[i][j] = m.citas_medico[i][j] ;
       }
     }     
  }
 return *this;
}

medico.h

#pragma once
#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
#include "cita.h"

class Medico
{
 private:
                char nombre[50];
                char especialidad[50];
                int num_colegiado;
                int num_horas_diarias;
                Cita **citas_medico;
                static long total_consultas;                
 public:
                void mostrar_calendario_citas(ostream &o=cout) const;
                bool asignar_cita(int d, int hor,Paciente *p=NULL);
                void anular_cita(int d, int hor);
                bool consultar_cita(char dni[10], int modificar=0);
                void modificar_cita(int d, int hor);                
                void vaciar_calendario_citas();
                void borrar_calendario_citas();                
                char* get_especialidad(char espec[50]) const;
                char* get_nombre(char n[50]) const;
                int get_num_colegiado() const;
                int get_num_horas() const;
                void set_num_horas(int horas);
                void mostrar_info(ostream &o=cout) const;
                static long get_total_consultas();
                Cita* operator[](int dia);
                void eliminar_calendario_citas();
                void crear_calendario_citas();    
                Medico(char *nom,char * espe,int colegiado,int trabajo);
                Medico(const Medico &m);
                Medico &operator=(const Medico &c);
                void operator delete(void*);
                ~Medico();
 };
 ostream& operator<<(ostream &o, Medico &c);
 ofstream& operator<<(ofstream &fichero, Medico &m);
 ifstream& operator>>(ifstream &fichero, Medico &m);
share|improve this question
2  
what's up with the #include abuse? – Idan K Feb 8 '10 at 10:15
1  
please reformat your code, removing all the unnecessary vertical whitespace – anon Feb 8 '10 at 10:18
    
Looks like homework to me – Manuel Feb 8 '10 at 10:23
2  
Why not use std::string instead of char*? Also strcpy is a potential security risk for it does not check array boundaries. – digitalarbeiter Feb 8 '10 at 10:25
    
Yes the problem is because im compiling with the windows gcc compiler, and when i change to Ubuntu, and try to compile i get this error, thanks – Chak Feb 8 '10 at 10:28
up vote 30 down vote accepted

Observations:

  • #include <cstring> should introduce std::strcpy().
  • using namespace std; (as written in medico.h) should introduce std::strcpy() into the global namespace.

Aside from using namespace std; being somewhat clumsy once the application grows larger (as it introduces one hell of a lot of identifiers into the global namespace), and that you should never use using in a header file (see below!), I am not at all sure if using namespace affects identifiers introduced after the statement.

(using namespace std is written in the header, which is included in medico.cpp, but #include <cstring> comes after that.)

My advice: Put the using namespace std; into medico.cpp, after any includes, and use explicit std:: in medico.h.


strcmpi() is not a standard function at all; while being defined on Windows, you have to solve case-insensitive compares differently on Linux.

(On general terms, I would like to point to this answer with regards to "proper" string handling in C and C++ that takes Unicode into account, as every application should. Summary: The standard cannot handle these things correctly; do use ICU.)


warning: deprecated conversion from string constant to ‘char*’

A "string constant" is when you write a string literal (e.g. "Hello") in your code. Its type is const char[], i.e. array of constant characters (as you cannot change the characters). You can assign an array to a pointer, but assigning to char *, i.e. removing the const qualifier, generates the warning you are seeing.


OT clarification: using in a header file changes visibility of identifiers for anyone including that header, which is usually not what the user of your header file wants. For example, I could use std::string and a self-written ::string just perfectly in my code, unless I include your medico.h, because then the two classes will clash.

Don't use using in header files.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank u, i think o solve the problem of error: ‘strcmpi’ was not declared in this scope I get another warning: warning: deprecated conversion from string constant to ‘char*’ – Chak Feb 8 '10 at 10:43
    
Sorry, didn't see the other two warning types. I usually fix only the first error before recompiling, as quite often many of the subsequent errors / warnings are follow-ups that vanish once the topmost problem is solved. I extended my answer to cover the other two cases. – DevSolar Feb 8 '10 at 10:55
    
THank you so much!!! very helpfull! – Chak Feb 8 '10 at 11:11
    
" am not at all sure if using namespace affects identifiers introduced after the statement." - it only affects identifiers introduced after the statement. It means that if an unqualified identifier is used later, then the namespace std will be searched for that identifier. (It sounds as if you're treating it as "import std into global" or something, which is not how it works). – M.M Nov 9 '14 at 7:54
    
@MattMcNabb: That was more along the lines of, "the OP is using it that way, and I am pretty sure it won't work that way, but am too lazy right now to look up chapter and verse of the standard". ;-) – DevSolar Nov 9 '14 at 13:58

When you say:

 #include <cstring>

the g++ compiler should put the <string.h> declarations it itself includes into the std:: AND the global namespaces. It looks for some reason as if it is not doing that. Try replacing one instance of strcpy with std::strcpy and see if that fixes the problem.

share|improve this answer
    
Not correct. <cstring> does put the declarations into std::, but whether or not it also puts them in the global namespace depends on the implementation. I am not sure if the standard even allows putting them into global, but I am positive it does not require it. – DevSolar Feb 8 '10 at 10:37
    
It does allow it, currently doesn't require it, and the behaviour I was talking about was that of g++. On my installation (version 4.4.1) it does what I said. – anon Feb 8 '10 at 10:44
    
Sorry, I'm a bit anal-retentive when it comes to the language standards. ;-) – DevSolar Feb 8 '10 at 10:47

This error sometimes occurs in a situation like this:

#ifndef NAN
#include <stdlib.h>
#define NAN (strtod("NAN",NULL))
#endif

static void init_random(uint32_t initseed=0)
{
    if (initseed==0)
    {
        struct timeval tv;
        gettimeofday(&tv, NULL);
        seed=(uint32_t) (4223517*getpid()*tv.tv_sec*tv.tv_usec);
    }
    else
        seed=initseed;
#if !defined(CYGWIN) && !defined(__INTERIX)
    //seed=42
    //SG_SPRINT("initializing random number generator with %d (seed size %d)\n", seed, RNG_SEED_SIZE)
    initstate(seed, CMath::rand_state, RNG_SEED_SIZE);
#endif
}

If the following code lines not run in the run-time:

#ifndef NAN
#include <stdlib.h>
#define NAN (strtod("NAN",NULL))
#endif

you will face with an error in your code like something as follows; because initstate is placed in the stdlib.h file and it's not included:

In file included from ../../shogun/features/SubsetStack.h:14:0, 
                 from ../../shogun/features/Features.h:21, 
                 from ../../shogun/ui/SGInterface.h:7, 
                 from MatlabInterface.h:15, 
                 from matlabInterface.cpp:7: 
../../shogun/mathematics/Math.h: In static member function 'static void shogun::CMath::init_random(uint32_t)': 
../../shogun/mathematics/Math.h:459:52: error: 'initstate' was not declared in this scope
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.