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What I aim is that if when hovered, and if the cell is already active, the hovered TD will be black (for deactivation), and orange for if it's still inactive (for activation).

But with my code, every time I hover it on td, the color won't return on its previous background color. (Still orange or black even the mouse leaves) What event should I be using?

$("td").hover(function(){
    var cell = $(this).html();

    if(cell == "")
        $(this).css( "background-color", "orange");
    else
        $(this).css( "background-color", "black");
});
share|improve this question
    
I think the problem is with the condition cell == "". It's better to check .length to see if there's something or not because checking == "" will not work if it's null for instance. Also, try to use .mouseover() instead of .hover() –  frenchie Mar 5 at 20:55
    
Any reason not to use :hover and forget the JS? –  Mooseman Mar 5 at 20:56
    
The hover method is made to use the mouseenter event with the mouseleave event, this function takes 2 parameters, the in (mouse enter) and the out (mouse leave). You should change the state of your element in each of these events. –  Loenix Mar 5 at 21:01

6 Answers 6

Instead of checking the empty value it's better to check the length of the content

$("td").hover(function(){
    var cell = $(this).html();

    if(cell.length===0)
        $(this).css( "background-color", "orange");
    else
        $(this).css( "background-color", "black");
});
share|improve this answer

Hover uses a handler in and handler out. 2 functions separated by comma hover()

I would use classes for the highlighting

.orange {
background: none no-repeat 0 0 orange;
}
.black{
background: none no-repeat 0 0 black;
}

Then use addClass and removeClass

$("td").hover(
    function(){
        var cell = $(this).html();
        if(cell == "") {
            $(this).addClass("orange");
        } else {
            $(this).addClass("black");
        }
    },
    function () {
            $(this).removeClass("orange").removeClass("black");
    }
});
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May i optimise your code? : $("td").hover(function(){ var cell = $(this).html(); $(this).toggleClass( cell=="" ? "orange" : "black"); }); –  Karl-André Gagnon Mar 5 at 21:04

Try creating and toggling a class, this will help you return to default state.

<Style>
.active {background-color:black;}
.inactive {background-color:orange;}
</style>

<script>
$("td").hover(function(){
var cell = $(this).html();

if(cell == ""){
    $(this).toggleClass("active");
}
else{
     $(this).toggleClass("inactive");
}
});

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Use mouseenter() and mouseleave() instead of hover().

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.hover() is a great function for toggling, but in you case, you are better by spliting the mouse leave and enter :

$('td').on({
    mouseenter : function(){
        var cell = $(this).html();

        if(cell.length===0)
            $(this).css( "background-color", "orange");
        else
            $(this).css( "background-color", "black");
    },
    mouseleave : function(){
        $(this).css('background-color', '');
    }
})  
share|improve this answer

What happens is when you call $(this).css( "background-color", "orange"); or similar you are changing the CSS and it'll stay that way until you ask to change it again.

When you only pass hover a single argument, it runs that same argument when you both enter, and leave, however if you pass a second argument in, then the first will be called for enter, the second for leave.

$("td").hover(function(){
    //Put original code here
}, function(){
    $(this).css( "background-color", /* Whatever the original color was */);
});
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