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I am trying to run a report to show a list of all dates within the past 90 days and then join that back to another table that has a date in one column and supplemental data in another. Here is how I am getting all the dates within a range:

 select trunc(sysdate-90) + rownum -1 from all_objects where rownum <=90

The problem is joining this to another table on date. If I run:

 select trunc(sysdate-90) + rownum -1, t.col2 from all_objects
 left join (select date, col2 from table) t on trunc(sysdate-90) + rownum -1 = t.date
 where rownum <=90

Then it only displays the first record from t.col2 for all values within the date range. How do I properly join these two tables?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Did you try giving an alias to the ALL_OBJECTS table? – Radix Mar 5 '14 at 21:44
    
Yes but then which columns do I join it on from ALL_OBJECTS? I believe I am using this table as a dual type to make it work. – AAA Mar 5 '14 at 21:48
    
Your query is syntactically incorrect, because there is a where before the left join. Please edit the question and fix the query. – Gordon Linoff Mar 5 '14 at 21:49
up vote 4 down vote accepted

A better way to get the previous 90 days is to use the dual / connect by trick:

select trunc(sysdate-level) as the_date from dual connect by level <= 90

Now, you should be able to do something like:

select the_date, t.col2
from (select trunc(sysdate-level) as the_date from dual connect by level <= 90) date_tbl
left join t on date_tbl.the_date = t.date
share|improve this answer
    
This worked PERFECT thank you! I didnt realize you could do a connect by / level here – AAA Mar 5 '14 at 21:56
    
I have to admit, the use of level is neat here. – Rob Baillie Mar 5 '14 at 21:58

Don't use all_objects, this is a really bad idea in terms of performance and your DBA will want to string you up. I have no idea where this idea of using all_objects came from originally, but I wish it would die!

In order to get a list of dates, you can implement a much simpler and fast bit of SQL:

SELECT TRUNC( SYSDATE ) - ROWNUM a_date
FROM DUAL
CONNECT BY ROWNUM <= (the number of days you want)

If you want an offset, you can add that

SELECT TRUNC( SYSDATE ) - ROWNUM + (the offset) a_date
FROM DUAL
CONNECT BY ROWNUM <= (the number of days you want)

If you want a different order you can wrap if in another select and then order:

SELECT a_date
FROM   (
  SELECT TRUNC( SYSDATE ) - ROWNUM + (the offset)
  FROM DUAL
  CONNECT BY ROWNUM <= (the number of days you want)
)
ORDER BY a_date ASC

You can then embed this into your existing statement, bearing in mind that you need it in a sub-select. The reason for that is so that your ROWNUM values don't get mixed up:

SELECT t.date, t.col_2
FROM    ( SELECT TRUNC( SYSDATE ) - ROWNUM a_date
          FROM DUAL
          CONNECT BY ROWNUM <= 90 ) date_list
LEFT JOIN table t ON date_list.a_date = t.date
ORDER BY a_date DESC
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the very clear explantation and option!! – AAA Mar 5 '14 at 21:56

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