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Can anyone explain why in the following query if I run it as is, it takes 2 seconds, if I remove "users.login" from select it takes 0.0 seconds. Also if I leave "users.login" and remove "users.usertypesid" it again takes 0.0 seconds. So only if both login and usertypesid are selected I get 2 secs execution time. I dont get it since these fields are numeric and simple varchar and they are not compared, sorted or used anyway in the where clause or order by. I even tried deleting all TEXT columns from tables (since I thought maybe buffer somehow is exceeded for rows) however nothing changes. The weirdest thing is that items and itemdescs are tables with thousands of records and if I omit or add some fields from those tables (select few fields from itemdescs instead of itemdescs., or also include items.) performance is always the same. However table "users" has only 5 records and if I select field which is numeric value (usertypesid) or login performance drops from 0.00 secs to 2 secs on 8 core latest hardware. How can 5 integers or 5 strings each 8 characters in length make that hardware process it for 2 seconds? Again these fields are never used in sort or anything else (compare, etc.) just included in select! Adding/removing indexes on those fields changes nothing too. Here is the query:

select SQL_NO_CACHE itemdescs.*, users.id, users.usertypesid, users.login
  from items, itemdescs, langs, users
 where itemdescs.itemsid=items.id 
   and itemdescs.langsid=langs.id
   and langs.tag='en'
   and items.usersid=users.id
 order by activationdate desc
 limit 0,8

And here are table definitions.

CREATE TABLE `items` (
    `id` INT(10) UNSIGNED NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
    `usersid` INT(10) UNSIGNED NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
    `activestatesid` INT(10) UNSIGNED NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
    `activationdate` DATE NOT NULL DEFAULT '2013-01-01',
    PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
    INDEX `usersid` (`usersid`),
    INDEX `activestatesid` (`activestatesid`),
    INDEX `activationdate` (`activationdate`)
)
COLLATE='utf8_unicode_ci'
ENGINE=InnoDB
AUTO_INCREMENT=31065;

CREATE TABLE `itemdescs` (
    `id` INT(10) UNSIGNED NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
    `itemsid` INT(10) UNSIGNED NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
    `langsid` INT(10) UNSIGNED NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
    `name` VARCHAR(255) NULL DEFAULT NULL COLLATE 'utf8_unicode_ci',
    `longdesc` VARCHAR(6000) NULL DEFAULT NULL COLLATE 'utf8_unicode_ci',
    `synonyms` VARCHAR(500) NULL DEFAULT NULL COLLATE 'utf8_unicode_ci',
    `shortdesc` VARCHAR(500) NULL DEFAULT NULL COLLATE 'utf8_unicode_ci',
    `mediumdesc` VARCHAR(1000) NULL DEFAULT NULL COLLATE 'utf8_unicode_ci',
    PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
    UNIQUE INDEX `itemsid_langsid` (`itemsid`, `langsid`),
    INDEX `itemsid` (`itemsid`),
    INDEX `langid` (`langsid`),
    INDEX `name` (`name`)
)
COLLATE='utf8_unicode_ci'
ENGINE=InnoDB
ROW_FORMAT=COMPACT
AUTO_INCREMENT=632465;

CREATE TABLE `langs` (
    `id` INT(10) UNSIGNED NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
    `name` VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL DEFAULT '0' COLLATE 'utf8_unicode_ci',
    `tag` VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL DEFAULT '0' COLLATE 'utf8_unicode_ci',
    PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
    INDEX `tag` (`tag`)
)
COLLATE='utf8_unicode_ci'
ENGINE=InnoDB
AUTO_INCREMENT=19;

CREATE TABLE `users` (
    `id` INT(10) UNSIGNED NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
    `usertypesid` INT(10) UNSIGNED NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
    `login` VARCHAR(50) NULL DEFAULT '0' COLLATE 'utf8_unicode_ci',
    PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
    INDEX `usertypesid` (`usertypesid`)
)
COLLATE='utf8_unicode_ci'
ENGINE=InnoDB
ROW_FORMAT=COMPACT
AUTO_INCREMENT=5;

Here is result of explain as requested:

Slow one (with login field): http://i.stack.imgur.com/bedvf.jpg

Fast one: http://i.stack.imgur.com/xjssj.jpg

I could not post as image since my reputation is below 10.

UPDATE: If I rewrite query like this, I get same results and it works instantly (0.000 sec):

select SQL_NO_CACHE 
*
from
(select items.usersid, itemdescs.*
  from items, itemdescs, langs
 where itemdescs.itemsid=items.id 
   and itemdescs.langsid=langs.id
   and langs.tag='en'
 order by activationdate desc
 limit 0,8) nousers, users
 where
 nousers.usersid=users.id

Now this works, but there is no explanation why table with only 5 records makes query slow (in the first example) and tables with thousands of rows do not affect it? How can I know when to rewrite query like this and which table to pay attention to?

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1  
And the EXPLAIN? –  Strawberry Mar 5 at 22:25
1  
Have you checked explain plan in both scenarios? –  Sachin Thapa Mar 5 at 22:26
    
You should post an SSCCE, you should remove all parts of the code that doesn't cause the problem. –  Lie Ryan Mar 5 at 22:35
    
I added explain image above. As for SSCCE it is already there, only thing which can be done is to also remove all fields from users table except those 3 in select as I mentioned. I will try to cut it down more, but I am not sure it is possible. Query is as simple as possible. Only thing left is to also send data somehow, which is too huge, thousands of rows and I do not have permission to post them anyway. –  Borg Drone Mar 5 at 22:49
    
There is still a lot that can be removed; column comments, indexes and constraints that aren't being used, columns that aren't used in the query. You should remove everything that doesn't cause the problem to change or disappear. Also, this is tangential, but you probably shouldn't store the pass field over there (as plain text presumably, since you have another passmd5 field). –  Lie Ryan Mar 6 at 0:15

4 Answers 4

Try these 3 things and see if it resolves the problem. 1) Convert to ANSI SQL; 2) get rid of everything known to not cause a problem; 3) remove the hint.

Even though ANSI SQL and your SQL are supposed to be equivalent, I've found cases where Oracle & MySQL treat the queries differently. Perhaps the slow down can be avoided using the ANSI query. Here's a stripped down version of your query, converted to ANSI.

select users.usertypesid, users.login
from items
 join itemdescs on itemdescs.itemsid = items.id
 join langs on langs.id = itemdescs.langsid
 join users on users.id = items.usersid
where langs.tag='en'
order by activationdate desc;
share|improve this answer
    
I have to add SQL_NO_CACHE otherwise query is cached and I do not get real world results, since in my tests cache is dirty after any record change for this particular query. Records will change all the time in real world so adding SQL_NO_CACHE is a must. I will try ANSI joins however I find it hard to believe it will change anything since field I select and which slows down the query is not included in comparison at all. –  Borg Drone Mar 6 at 0:00

When using indexes, you need to find a fine balance, if you are already having problems with SELECTS, these tables will be very slow for INSERTS, DELETES, and UPDATES. Have lots of indexes and the index file will get rather large. Try removing indexes only keeping the ones used for Primary Keys and Joins.

Another thing to consider is changing your syntax in the SELECT to the newer method of joining.

SELECT SQL_NO_CACHE itemdescs.*, users.id, users.usertypesid, users.login 
FROM itemdescs
INNER JOIN items ON itemdescs.itemsid = items.id 
INNER JOIN users ON itemdescs.usersid = users.id
INNER JOIN langs ON itemdescs.langsid = langs.id
WHERE langs.tag = 'en'
ORDER BY items.activationdate
LIMIT 0, 8;

The best candidates for INDEXES here are:

items.id
users.id
langs.id
itemsdescs.itemsid
itemdescs.usersid
itemsdescs.langsid
items.activationdate

Index columns that you use for searching, sorting, or grouping, not columns you select for output.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, I will try newer syntax of joining, thanks. As for the indexes, current state is after I started trying desperate attempts like adding indexes to all fields, removing some columns, removing text columns, etc. Original tables had much less amount of indexes. I am trying to strip down everything now to as simplest as possible case. –  Borg Drone Mar 5 at 23:55

I agree with comments from both of the other answers, but will expand on some additional elements... You should probably look into "covering indexes" too for your education. An engine is only going to utilize one index per table that might best fit the query being executed. That said, having three separate indexes for tg, items, langs would be a poor choice. Instead, it should be a SINGLE index with all the querying criteria and order by may significantly increase performance...

To prevent the need of going back to the raw data pages, covering indexes include the fields needed. I would have the following indexes for the respective tables.

table         index
users         ( id, usertypesid, login)
items         ( id, usersid, activationdate desc )
langs         ( id, tag )
itemdescs     ( langsid, activationdate desc, itemsid )

And the query

select SQL_NO_CACHE 
      itemdescs.*, 
      users.id, 
      users.usertypesid, 
      users.login
   from 
      itemdescs
         JOIN langs
            on itemdescs.langsid = langs.id
            and langs.tag = 'en'
         JOIN items
            on itemdescs.itemsid = items.id 
            JOIN users
               items.usersid = users.id
   order by
      items.activationdate desc
   limit 
      0,8

One other possible optimization is the keyword "STRAIGHT_JOIN" which tells the MySQL engine to query in the order you have laid out. Some times this can significantly help the query run. If so, just change...

select SQL_NO_CACHE 

to

select STRAIGHT_JOIN SQL_NO_CACHE 
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for instructive answer, however as I stated above when I add index as you suggested too ( id, usertypesid, login) it works instantly, but problem is that in real word I need to take all fields from users table, one of them being TEXT. I tried already creating index containing all fields and TEXT(100) but it is still slow as before. What would you suggest in case I need to take all fields from all 4 tables? –  Borg Drone Mar 6 at 3:52

Final solution was using force index on items table. I added index adate(activationdate desc) and MySQL did not use it, so query was still slow (around 2sec). After I forced index like this:

select SQL_NO_CACHE itemdescs.*, users.id, users.usertypesid, users.login
  from items force index(adate), itemdescs, langs, users
 where itemdescs.itemsid=items.id 
   and itemdescs.langsid=langs.id
   and langs.tag='en'
   and items.usersid=users.id
 order by activationdate desc
 limit 0,8

Query run in 0.000 sec. Does anyone know why MySQL could not figure out it needs to use this index? Also, since I want to put this part in view:

select SQL_NO_CACHE itemdescs.*, users.id, users.usertypesid, users.login
  from items force index(adate), itemdescs, langs, users
 where itemdescs.itemsid=items.id 
   and itemdescs.langsid=langs.id
   and langs.tag='en'
   and items.usersid=users.id

And later on call it like this from client side (actually that's already in client but with bad performance):

select * from myview (items force index(adate)) where DYNAMIC CONDITIONS GO HERE order by itemsactivationdate desc limit 0,10

However there is no such syntax in MySQL. So does anyone know how can I do that, or is it even possible? If not it is headache since client apps use views all the time and if I can not use force index on them and MySQL query plan is bad (which is the case) there is basically no other solution except rewrite code on all clients? Can I rewrite the query somehow so that it uses correct index without using "force index"?

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