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Currently having problems calling functions from other PHP classes in the same folder. I have instantiated the class and everything, and it still doesn't work for me. The error message I get when calling a function from the first class is:

method getHello() not found in class.

Hope anyone know how to fix this issue, believe I have done something wrong somewhere. Thank you very much in advance, below is the code for both php files.

<?php
class one 
{

    private $hello;

    public function __construct()
    {
        $this->hello = '';
    }

    public function getHello()
    {
        return $this->hello;
    }

    public function setHello($newHello)
    {
        $this->hello = $newHello;
    }
}
?>

and the second class

<?php

class two 
{

    private $sixPack;

    public function __contruct()
    {
        $this->sixPack  = new one();
    }

    public function setSixPack($newSixPack)
    {
        $this->sixPack = $newSixPack;
    }

    public function getSixPack()
    {
        return $this->sixPack;
    }

    public function access_function_one_methods()
    {
        // this is causing the problem, cannot access getHello

        $sad = $this->sixPack->getHello();
    }
}
?>
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closed as off-topic by jeroen, vascowhite, andrewsi, Chris, Hidde Apr 12 at 21:53

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question was caused by a problem that can no longer be reproduced or a simple typographical error. While similar questions may be on-topic here, this one was resolved in a manner unlikely to help future readers. This can often be avoided by identifying and closely inspecting the shortest program necessary to reproduce the problem before posting." – vascowhite, andrewsi, Chris, Hidde
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
why don't use extends –  robert Mar 5 at 22:35
    
How are you calling your methods, have you perhaps used the setter of class two and overwritten the variable with something else? –  jeroen Mar 5 at 22:44
1  
@Jordan Correct, your code runs just fine / without any errors when you fix the typo in the constructor and include both files: codepad.viper-7.com/EEgxcO –  jeroen Mar 5 at 22:54
2  
By the way, you should post the complete error message and not just an extract. –  jeroen Mar 5 at 23:01
1  
@jeroen Thanks for looking into it, seemed that the typo was the issue!! Cheers guys –  Jordan Mar 5 at 23:11

2 Answers 2

This seems to work, im not sure if it is what you want it, but give it a try:::

file for class two::

            private $sixPack;

            public function __construct()
            {
                include_once('/Users/hakunamatata/Desktop/one.php');
                $this->sixPack  = new one();
                print("second construct \n");
            }

            public function setSixPack($newSixPack)
            {
                $this->sixPack = $newSixPack;
            }

            public function getSixPack()
            {
                return $this->sixPack;
            }

            public function access_function_one_methods()
            {
                // this is causing the problem, cannot access getHello
                print("function calling class one \n");
                $sad = $this->sixPack->getHello();
                echo $sad;
            }
          }
        $two = new two();
        echo $two->access_function_one_methods();
?>

file for class one::

<?php
    class one {

                    private $hello = "Je";
                    public function __construct()
                    {
                        print("first construct \n");
                        $this->hello = 'Hello';
                    }

                    public function getHello()
                    {
                        echo "we are here \n";
                        return $this->hello;
                    }

                    public function setHello($newHello)
                    {
                        $this->hello = $newHello;
                    }
                 }

?>

console output:::

first construct 
second construct 
function calling class one 
we are here 
Hello
share|improve this answer
    
Or you could try a two file version, similar to what you currently have - elearningmag.info/notprathap/sample.zip –  Prathap Mar 5 at 22:59
    
it will be same, just include_once the file –  jycr753 Mar 5 at 22:59
    
me too find no error –  robert Mar 5 at 23:00
1  
@jycr753 Thanks for the huge effort. It is now working, believe the typo was the main think to change –  Jordan Mar 5 at 23:08

is that a spello in the constructor? perhaps call it __construct()? (missing an s?)

share|improve this answer
    
    
+1 Why is this downvoted? It could very well be the problem; if there is no constructor, the variable is not initialized as an instance of the other class. –  jeroen Mar 5 at 22:34
    
@jycr753 the suggestion was not that a constructor is mandatory. He initializes sixpack in the constructor, so he can't have a spello in there. –  Prathap Mar 5 at 22:35
3  
@jeroen presumably because it should have been a comment, rather than an answer –  Mark Parnell Mar 5 at 22:37
1  
@MarkParnell Okay, but then at least leave a comment that it should be improved. As it is, it (probably, judging by the error message...) solves the problem so a downvote seems unnecessary. –  jeroen Mar 5 at 22:39

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