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i was once supposed to make a short assembler code for dividing with numbers that are not power of 2. My solution was subtracting the divider in cycles and the number of cycles was the actual result. Is there anything faster? What's the usual way to sort this out?

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What processor? Most have in-built division opcodes –  Meinersbur Feb 8 '10 at 11:11
    
you made the poorest choice by picking subtraction to divide numbers :) –  Nick Dandoulakis Feb 8 '10 at 11:18
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Even if it doesn't have a divison opcode, what is fast and what isn't depends mostly on the processor architecture, or to be more specific which instructions it has and which are fast. For processors without builtin division I would assume that some other common opcodes might be missing or slow (abitrary bit shifts and multiplications come to mind), which might impact some algorithms more then others. But to answer the first question: Yes, there are faster algorithms for this sort of thing. –  Grizzly Feb 8 '10 at 11:22
    
i don't know what processor was that anymore. It's just that i'm making some program in C++ now and i'm deciding whether use division to solve one problem or make up something else to make it faster. –  stupid_idiot Feb 8 '10 at 11:23
    
@Grizzly: I used to do this sort of thing on a Z80, an eight-bit CPU with no multiplication or division functions. IIRC, I usually did shifts and subtracts, and got reasonably efficient results. (There were no arbitrary bit shifts, had to do them one at a time.) Counting subtracts is a bad idea. –  David Thornley Feb 10 '10 at 21:57
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Repeated subtraction is a dangerously inefficient way of doing division. In the worst case, an N-bit division can take O(2**N) subtractions!!

@Johannes answer has a link that gives you algorithms that work much better than that.

If I was asked to implement division in assembler, I'd probably do an extensive search for an existing library of numeric routines. This is the kind of problem where it takes a lot of expertise to come up with close to optimal code.

EDIT : in response to the OP's comment:

It's just that i'm making some program in C++ now and i'm deciding whether use division to solve one problem or make up something else to make it faster.

I suggest that you just use division, and leave it to the C++ compiler to generate the most efficient instruction sequence to achieve the required result for your particular target platform.

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There are a bunch of algorithms mentioned and detailed on Wikipedia.

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oh.. i forgot to check english wikipedia.. thx. –  stupid_idiot Feb 8 '10 at 11:20
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